15 people have been charged in the Flint water scandal

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DETROIT (AP) — Fifteen people have been charged in an investigation of how Flint’s water became contaminated with lead in 2014-15 and a related outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease. Seven people have pleaded no contest to misdemeanors in deals that will leave them without a criminal record.

— Michael Prysby, Stephen Busch, Liane Shekter Smith, Adam Rosenthal, all from the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality.

— Mike Glasgow and Daugherty “Duffy” Johnson, who both worked for the city of Flint.

— Corinne Miller of the state Department of Health and Human Services.

Charges are pending against eight people:

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— Nick Lyon, former director of the state health department. Involuntary manslaughter, misconduct in office.

— Dr. Eden Wells, former Michigan chief medical executive. Involuntary manslaughter, obstructing justice, lying, misconduct in office.

— Nancy Peeler and Robert Scott of the state health department. Misconduct in office, conspiracy.

— Patrick Cook of the Department of Environmental Quality. Misconduct in office, conspiracy.

— Gerald Ambrose, former Flint emergency manager. Conspiracy, misconduct in office, false pretenses.

— Darnell Earley, former Flint emergency manager. Involuntary manslaughter, conspiracy, misconduct in office.

— Howard Croft, former director of Flint public works. Involuntary manslaughter, conspiracy.

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

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