Alaska man who tracks down stolen vehicles enters plea deal

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ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — An Alaska man has agreed to a plea deal that includes a promise to stop chasing after stolen vehicles.

The Anchorage Daily News reported Saturday that 54-year-old Floyd Hall pleaded guilty to one count of reckless endangerment resulting in a 30-day suspended sentence and a $500 fine.

Officials say the terms of Hall’s three-year probation sentence include a pledge to refrain from chasing anyone driving a suspected stolen vehicle.

The newspaper reports that Hall can remain involved with a group calling itself the “A Team” that relies on social media tipoffs to recover stolen automobiles.

Hall engaged in a 19-month court case resulting from an August 2017 charge of reckless driving for what police say was a high-speed chase, but Hall contends only involved following the vehicle.

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The prosecuting attorney declined to comment.

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Information from: Anchorage Daily News, http://www.adn.com

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