Path 27

Algeria's army chief renews push for presidential election

Path 27

ALGIERS, Algeria (AP) — Algeria’s powerful army chief is stressing the need for political dialogue that would lead to a presidential election, as a people’s revolt for democracy remains at an impasse with the government.

Ahmed Gaid Salah also said on Monday that a crackdown on “the scourge of corruption” since President Abdelaziz Bouteflika resigned in early April would spare none of those who benefited at the expense of Algerian citizens.

The remarks Gaid Salah made in a speech were his first public comments in three weeks. He helped pressure Bouteflika to step down, but angered pro-democracy protesters afterward by supporting a since-canceled presidential election that had been set for July 4.

Two former prime ministers, several once-powerful generals and the ex-president’s brother are the people already jailed on suspicion of corruption.

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →



loading

We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
Path 27
The Associated Press is an independent, not-for-profit news cooperative headquartered in New York City. Their teams in over 100 countries tell the world’s stories, from breaking news to investigative reporting. They provide content and services to help engage audiences worldwide, working with companies of all types, from broadcasters to brands.
The Associated Press was the first private sector organization in the U.S. to operate on a national scale. Over the past 170 years, they have been first to inform the world of many of history's most important moments, from the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and the bombing of Pearl Harbor to the fall of the Shah of Iran and the death of Pope John Paul.

Today, they operate in 263 locations in more than 100 countries relaying breaking news, covering war and conflict and producing enterprise reports that tell the world's stories.
Location
New York City




loading

Conversation