Attorney: Brothers regret role in alleged Smollett scheme

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CHICAGO (AP) — The attorney for two brothers accused of helping stage an attack on “Empire” actor Jussie Smollett in downtown Chicago says the men regret their involvement.

Gloria Schmidt represents Abimbola “Abel” and Olabinjo “Ola” Osundairo. She told The Associated Press on Wednesday that the brothers agreed to help Smollett because of their friendship with him and the sense that he was helping them in their careers.

Schmidt says the brothers have come to realize how much the incident has negatively affected minorities and particularly victims of actual hate crimes.

Smollett is charged with lying to the police about being the victim of a racist and homophobic attack by two masked men. He allegedly paid the Osundairo brothers $3,500 to help him stage the attack.

Smollett is expected to enter a plea on Thursday.

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Check out the AP’s complete coverage of the Jussie Smollett case.

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