Comey says House Republicans are 'shameful' after interview

Combined Shape

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former FBI Director James Comey had harsh words for House Republicans on Monday, saying their silence in response to President Donald Trump’s attacks on the Justice Department is “shameful.”

Comey said Republicans “have to have the courage to stand up and speak the truth, not be cowed by mean tweets or fear of their base.”

He was on Capitol Hill for a second closed-door interview with two Republican-led committees investigating what they say was bias at the Justice Department before the 2016 presidential election. Republicans argue department officials conspired against Trump as they started an investigation into his ties to Russia and cleared Democrat Hillary Clinton in a separate probe of her email use. Democrats have called the GOP investigation “nonsense.”

Comey, who led both investigations, mocked the congressional probe, saying the questions were about “Hillary Clinton’s emails and the Steele dossier” — two favorite subjects of Republicans who insist there was bias in the department. The dossier was Democratic-funded opposition research on Trump’s ties to Russia compiled by former British spy Christopher Steele.

“This while the president of the United States is lying about the FBI, attacking the FBI and attacking the rule of law in this country. How does that make any sense at all?” Comey asked.

Trending:
Watch: Biden Stumbles, Struggles to Speak for 41 Seconds Straight

Trump has repeatedly gone after the FBI for bias as his campaign has been under investigation. He has called special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation a “hoax.” On Sunday, he called his former personal lawyer, Michael Cohen, a “rat” because he has cooperated with prosecutors.

Comey said Trump “is calling a witness who is cooperating with his own Justice Department a rat — say that again to yourself at home, and remind yourself where we have ended up.”

White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders responded Monday night on Twitter, writing: “Republicans should stand up to Comey and his tremendous corruption. … The President did the country a service by firing him and exposing him for the shameless fraud he is.”

The House Judiciary and Oversight and Government Reform committees are wrapping up a yearlong investigation into the department’s decisions before Democrats take the majority in January. Comey first testified Dec. 7.

A transcript released after Comey’s first interview showed a heavy focus on the Clinton email probe. A transcript of the second interview will also be released.

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →






We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
The Associated Press is an independent, not-for-profit news cooperative headquartered in New York City. Their teams in over 100 countries tell the world’s stories, from breaking news to investigative reporting. They provide content and services to help engage audiences worldwide, working with companies of all types, from broadcasters to brands.
The Associated Press was the first private sector organization in the U.S. to operate on a national scale. Over the past 170 years, they have been first to inform the world of many of history's most important moments, from the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and the bombing of Pearl Harbor to the fall of the Shah of Iran and the death of Pope John Paul.

Today, they operate in 263 locations in more than 100 countries relaying breaking news, covering war and conflict and producing enterprise reports that tell the world's stories.
Location
New York City




Conversation