Share

Eva Longoria a triple threat with ABC series 'Grand Hotel'

Share

PASADENA, Calif. (AP) — A roundup of news Friday from the Television Critics Association winter meeting, where TV networks and streaming services are presenting details on upcoming programs.

STREEP STEPS IN

Meryl Streep’s self-professed addiction to “Big Little Lies” had the bonus of turning the Oscar-winning actress into a star of the HBO drama’s second season.

“I loved this show. I was addicted to it. I thought it was an amazing exercise in what we know and don’t know about people — about family, about friends, about how we flirted with the mystery of things,” Streep said Friday. “I wanted to do it to be in that world. The world they created was amazing.”

In the seven-episode season beginning in June, Streep plays Mary Louise Wright, mother-in-law to Nicole Kidman’s Celeste, whose abusive husband, Perry, died at the end of season one.

Trending:
Trump's Surgeon General Says He Tried to Refinance His Mortgage, But Biden Admin Pulled a Dirty Move to Stop It from Happening

David E. Kelley, who wrote both seasons, joked that the much-acclaimed Streep had to pass muster to get the role.

“We looked at Meryl’s demo reel,” Kelley told a TV critics meeting. He noted that the character of Mary Louise was created by Liane Moriarty, whose novel “Big Little Lies” was adapted for the original season.

Nicole Kidman and Reese Witherspoon return as executive producers and stars of the drama set in Monterey, California. Returning co-stars Laura Dern, Zoe Kravitz and Shailene Woodley comprise the so-called “Monterey Five” circle, joined together by dark secrets.

“We had such a good time doing it, and the desire to spend more time together had a lot to do with it,” said Kidman, explaining the drama’s return. “Also, there was an enormous demand from the audience … It was generated by the audience, and the desire to see these people still in existence.”

She noted the rarity of a series with so many female leads — let alone produced by and, this season, directed by a woman, Andrea Arnold — and the cast said the camaraderie they enjoyed last season was repeated.

Asked who proved the best storyteller in their off-camera moments, Streep’s co-stars chorused, “Meryl!”

Streep modestly waved off the compliment, then added: “What happens in Monterey, stays in Monterey.”

___

SELINA’S CHOICE

Related:
Biden's Department of Homeland Security Reveals the Fate of Around 12,400 Migrants Who Illegally Crossed the Border

“Veep” star Julia Louis-Dreyfus doesn’t know who she’ll support for president in 2020, but she is sure about who she won’t.

She called Donald Trump a “pretend president” and said “I’m not a fan.”

Louis-Dreyfus was asked her political views while promoting the final, seven-episode season of her HBO series, which begins on March 31. “Veep” has won three Emmys for best comedy series and the series star won four best actress awards.

She’s on location shooting a movie in Austria and said via satellite that she’s constantly approached by people who ask her opinion on Trump. She says she doesn’t hesitate to give an answer.

“I have no idea who I’m going to support in 2020 except to say that it’s a Democrat,” she said.

____

FREE SOLO

Makers of the “Free Solo” documentary about Alex Honnold’s unaided climb up the rock face of Yosemite’s El Capitan say they would have still made the film if Honnold had slipped and fell to his death.

Film editor Bob Eisenhardt said that he believed the film would have been completed to honor Honnold’s memory.

“We were going to make it either way,” he said at a news conference where The National Geographic network said “Free Solo” will make its television debut March 3. It will be shown without commercials.

The pulse-pounding film about his quest has been nominated for an Academy Award and been a box office smash in a strong year for documentaries, second only to “Won’t You Be My Neighbor” in earnings.

Honnold achieved his remarkable feat in just under four hours in June 2017. Without ropes or harnesses, he climbed using his chalk-dried hands and climbing shoes, grabbing onto cracks and crevasses. The danger is obvious in the sweeping views.

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →



loading

We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
Share
The Associated Press is an independent, not-for-profit news cooperative headquartered in New York City. Their teams in over 100 countries tell the world’s stories, from breaking news to investigative reporting. They provide content and services to help engage audiences worldwide, working with companies of all types, from broadcasters to brands.
The Associated Press was the first private sector organization in the U.S. to operate on a national scale. Over the past 170 years, they have been first to inform the world of many of history's most important moments, from the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and the bombing of Pearl Harbor to the fall of the Shah of Iran and the death of Pope John Paul.

Today, they operate in 263 locations in more than 100 countries relaying breaking news, covering war and conflict and producing enterprise reports that tell the world's stories.
Location
New York City




loading

Conversation