Kenya court postpones ruling on anti-gay laws to May 24

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NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — A Kenyan court Friday postponed a ruling on whether to decriminalize same sex relationships, disappointing many in the country’s LGBT community.

The ruling will not be made until May 24 because some judges had been busy, Justice Chaacha Mwita of the High Court said.

Several activists who went to the court for the landmark ruling expressed their dismay.

“To say we are disappointed would be an understatement,” the National Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission, which is among the petitioners in the case, said in a tweet.

A case so important should have been should have been given the time it deserves, said activist Grace Mbijiwa outside the courtroom.

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“However we are looking forward because we have a date in May 2019,” said Mbijiwa. “We are looking forward and hoping for the best, looking forward for LGBT being legalized.”

Activists argue that the colonial-era law which criminalizes same consensual sex-relations between adults is in breach of the constitution because it denies basic rights.

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