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Maximum Security owner challenges horses helped by Derby DQ

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BALTIMORE (AP) — The owner of Maximum Security has made a multimillion-dollar challenge to the owners of four horses that benefited from his horse’s historic disqualification in the Kentucky Derby.

Gary West says in a statement Friday he’ll pay each of those other owners $5 million apiece if Country House, War of Will, Long Range Toddy or Bodexpress finishes ahead of Maximum Security in the next race against him through the end of the year.

West offered an alternate possibility of a $1.86 million wager — the winner’s share for the Kentucky Derby. The condition of the challenge is that each owner must also put up $5 million or $1.86 million in an escrow account.

Maximum Security crossed the finish line first in the Derby on May 4 but was disqualified for interference and placed 17th. Country House, who finished second, was elevated to first, War of Will from eighth to seventh, Bodexpress from 14th to 13th and Long Range Toddy from 17th to 16th.

West and his wife, Mary, filed a lawsuit this week against the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission and stewards over the first on-track disqualification of a Derby winner in the race’s 145-year history.

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The Wests elected not to run Maximum Security in the Preakness. War of Will and Bodexpress are in the field.

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