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Mobster hit suspect shows symbol linked to conspiracy theory

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TOMS RIVER, N.J. (AP) — The man charged with killing the reputed boss of the Gambino crime family had a symbol on his hand that some say is associated with a conspiracy theory.

Anthony Comello was arrested Saturday in the death of Francesco “Franky Boy” Cali.

Before a hearing in New Jersey, Comello held up his left hand.

On it were scrawled slogans supporting President Donald Trump, including “MAGA Forever.”

That refers to Trump’s “Make America Great Again” campaign slogan.

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In the center of his palm was what appeared to be a “Q.” The letter is associated with QAnon.

That’s a conspiracy theory that suggests a “deep state” plot against Trump and contends special counsel Robert Mueller is actually investigating former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and former President Barack Obama.

Asked what was on Comello’s hand, his lawyer Brian Neary replied: “Handcuffs.”

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

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