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Motorist hit in face by frozen turkey dies years later at 59

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LAKE RONKONKOMA, N.Y. (AP) — A New Yorker who urged leniency for the teenager who nearly killed her in 2004 by throwing a frozen turkey through her car windshield has died. Victoria Ruvolo was 59.

Anthony Ruvolo says his aunt died Monday. The cause is unknown, and it’s unclear whether the old injuries contributed to her death.

Newsday says every bone in Ruvolo’s face was shattered and the steering wheel bent when the teenager threw the 20-pound turkey at her car.

She endured reconstructive surgery and months of rehabilitation.

Because of her advocacy, the youth got six months in jail instead of a potential 25-year prison sentence.

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Ruvolo, of Lake Ronkonkoma (rahn-KAHN’-kuh-muh), became an author and motivational speaker .

Linda Anne Lynch says her friend was a “believer in second chances.”

She adds: “Forgive someone today in Vickie’s memory.”

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Information from: Newsday, http://www.newsday.com

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

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