MSNBC's Mika Brzezinski apologizes for homophobic comment

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NEW YORK (AP) — President Trump attacked MSNBC’s Mika Brzezinski on Thursday for using a homophobic slur on the air and tweeted that if a conservative person had said it, “that person would be banned permanently from television.”

“She will probably be given a pass despite their terrible ratings,” Trump said.

“Morning Joe,” the show Brzezinski co-hosts with husband Joe Scarborough, regularly has harsh takes on Trump and his administration. Brzezinski was criticizing Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Thursday for comments regarding the murder of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

She said it sounded like Pompeo was carrying water for a “wanna-be dictator,” using a cruder term.

Afterward, she apologized via Twitter, saying it was a “SUPER BAD choice of words.”

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MSNBC had no comment on Trump’s tweet.

Brzezinski was not on the air Thursday due to a long-planned family matter, an MSNBC spokesman said. Her Pompeo reference, which had drawn social media criticism, was not mentioned on the air.

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