News

Report: Biden to Set Refugee Cap Four Times Higher Than Current Level

Combined Shape

President Joe Biden is formally lifting the nation’s refugee cap to 62,500 this year, according to a congressional aide briefed on the plans, weeks after facing bipartisan blowback for his delay in lifting former President Donald Trump’s limit of 15,000.

Biden last month moved to expand the eligibility criteria for resettlements, removing one roadblock to refugees entering the U.S. put in place by Trump.

However, he had initially stopped short of lifting the annual cap, with aides saying they did not believe it was necessary.

But Biden faced sharp pushback for not at least taking the symbolic step of authorizing more refugees to enter the U.S. this year and swiftly reversed course.

“Completely and utterly unacceptable,” Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio Cortez of New York wrote of Biden’s initial actions.

Trending:
Fred Weinberg: Getting Rid of Liz Cheney Is the Start to Taking Back Our Government

“Biden promised to welcome immigrants, and people voted for him based on that promise. Upholding the xenophobic and racist policies of the Trump admin, incl the historically low + plummeted refugee cap, is flat out wrong.”

“Keep your promise,” she concluded.

“As a refugee, I know finding a home is a matter of life or death for children around the world,” Democratic Rep. Ilhan Omar of Minnesota tweeted. “It is shameful that @POTUS is reneging on a key promise to welcome refugees, moments after @RepSchakowsky @RepJayapal, myself and others called on him to increase the refugee cap.”

The aide said Biden would lift the cap Monday in a new presidential determination.

The official spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss Biden’s action before it was public.

The White House has said it was highly unlikely that Biden could meet the 62,500 cap by the end of the fiscal year in September, given the pandemic and limitations on the country’s resettlement capabilities.

Related:
Don't Believe the Dems - Almost Zero Americans Actually Make Minimum Wage

That said, they maintain Biden remains committed to setting the cap at 125,000 for the 2022 fiscal year that starts in October, while they were working to improve U.S. capabilities to process refugees to be able to accept as many of them as possible under the new cap.

Secretary of State Antony Blinken notified Congress on Feb. 12 of a plan to raise the ceiling on admissions to 62,500, but no presidential determination followed.

In an emergency declaration on April 16, Biden stated the admission of up to 15,000 refugees set by Trump this year “remains justified by humanitarian concerns and is otherwise in the national interest.”

Do you think this decision will help the Biden administration handle the border crisis?

“Failing to issue a new Determination undermines your declared purpose to reverse your predecessor’s refugee policies,” New Jersey Democratic Senator Bob Menendez, the chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, wrote in a letter to Biden.

The new allocation instituted by Biden added more slots for refugees from Africa, the Middle East and Central America and ended Trump’s restrictions on resettlements from Somalia, Syria and Yemen.

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →






We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
, , , , , , , , ,
The Associated Press is an independent, not-for-profit news cooperative headquartered in New York City. Their teams in over 100 countries tell the world’s stories, from breaking news to investigative reporting. They provide content and services to help engage audiences worldwide, working with companies of all types, from broadcasters to brands.
The Associated Press was the first private sector organization in the U.S. to operate on a national scale. Over the past 170 years, they have been first to inform the world of many of history's most important moments, from the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and the bombing of Pearl Harbor to the fall of the Shah of Iran and the death of Pope John Paul.

Today, they operate in 263 locations in more than 100 countries relaying breaking news, covering war and conflict and producing enterprise reports that tell the world's stories.
Location
New York City




Conversation