Sports

Teen Shapovalov earns early morning win at Miami Open

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MIAMI GARDENS, Fla. (AP) — Denis Shapovalov worked the late-night shift to reach the quarterfinals at the Miami Open.

The 19-year-old Canadian left-hander beat 20-year-old Stefanos Tsitsipas of Greece 4-6, 6-3, 7-6 (3) in a match that started following a two-hour rain delay and ended shortly after 1:30 Wednesday morning.

The match was extremely close: Each player won 100 points. It offered a peek at the future of men’s tennis, with Shapovalov seeded No. 20 and Tsitsipas No. 8.

“I knew Stefanos was going to be a tough match,” Shapovalov said. “I was ready for a long battle and, sure enough, it went the distance. I’m just happy with the way I controlled myself.”

Shapovalov beat a Top 10 opponent for the second time in his career. He’ll next play No. 28-seeded Frances Tiafoe, who eliminated David Goffin on Tuesday night 7-5, 7-6 (6).

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“We’re both shotmakers,” Shapovalov said. “I’m just ready for another fun, tough match.”

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More AP tennis coverage: https://apnews.com/apf-Tennis and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

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