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The Latest: Death toll from Indonesia tsunami now 281

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TANJUNG LESUNG, Indonesia (AP) — The Latest on a tsunami that hit along Indonesia’s Sunda Strait (all times local):

8:15 p.m.

Indonesia’s disaster agency says the death toll from the weekend tsunami has climbed to 373.

Disaster agency spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho said Monday that 128 others were missing in the disaster, with 1,459 injured.

The waves washed ashore along western Java and southern Sumatra islands Saturday night following a volcanic eruption.

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Hundreds of military personnel and volunteers combed debris-strewn beaches Monday looking for victims.

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12:30 p.m.

Thousands of soldiers, police and government personnel as well as volunteers are working to find victims of an Indonesian tsunami.

At least 281 people died and more than 1,000 were injured when the waves washed ashore along western Java and southern Sumatra islands Saturday night following a volcanic eruption.

The tsunami was not huge and did not surge far inland, but its force was destructive. Disaster agency spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho said more than 600 homes, many hotels and vendor stalls, and more than 400 boats and ships were damaged. The number of casualties may still rise.

Nugroho said Monday, “It is suspected that some victims are still trapped under wreckage and materials washed away by the tsunami.”

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9 a.m.

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The death toll from an Indonesian tsunami has risen past 280 with more than 1,000 people injured.

The tsunami struck Sunda Strait coastal areas along western Java and southern Sumatra islands without warning in the darkness Saturday night.

Disaster agency spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho said the latest tolls Monday morning were 281 dead and 1,016 injured. The tally of missing is 57 but the numbers are expected to rise.

The waves that swept terrified people into the sea followed an eruption and possible landslide on Anak Krakatau, one of the world’s most infamous volcanic islands.

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8:20 a.m.

Doctors are working to help survivors and rescuers are looking for more victims from a deadly tsunami that smashed into beachside buildings without warning in the darkness along an Indonesian strait.

The waves that swept terrified people into the sea Saturday night followed an eruption and possible landslide on Anak Krakatau, one of the world’s most infamous volcanic islands.

At least 222 people were killed, more than 800 were injured, and dozens have been reported missing after the tsunami hit coastal areas along western Java and southern Sumatra islands. The death toll could increase once authorities hear from all stricken areas.

Indonesian President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo expressed his sympathy and ordered government agencies to respond quickly to the disaster.

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

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