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The Latest: Pelosi says she's 'done with' Trump

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WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on Congress and special counsel Robert Mueller’s report (all times local):

5:15 p.m.

The House Judiciary Committee chairman says his panel will move “as quickly as possible” to seek court enforcement of a subpoena against former White House Counsel Don McGahn.

New York Democratic Rep. Jerrold Nadler spoke after the House approved a resolution that makes it easier to file lawsuits against witnesses who defy subpoenas. That includes McGahn, who declined last month to provide documents or testimony at the urging of the White House. McGahn is the most-cited witness in special counsel Robert Mueller’s report.

The resolution passed 229-191 Tuesday, along party lines. Democrats have moved toward lawsuits as they investigate President Donald Trump and his administration.

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Mueller found no conspiracy between Trump and Russia, but did not clear him of obstruction.

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4:30 p.m.

The House has approved a resolution that will make it easier to file lawsuits against the Trump administration when officials defy subpoenas.

The legislation passed 229-191, along party lines.

It empowers Democrats to take legal action to enforce subpoenas against Attorney General William Barr and former White House counsel Don McGahn. It also allows committee chairmen to take future legal action without a vote of the full House, as long as they have approval from a bipartisan group of House leaders.

Tuesday’s vote reflects an evolving strategy for Democrats, who have moved toward lawsuits and away from criminal contempt as they investigate President Donald Trump and his administration.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Democrats “need answers on the questions left unanswered” by special counsel Robert Mueller’s Trump-Russia report.

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11:20 a.m.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi is brushing back impeachment questions, saying “it’s not even close” to having enough support among House Democrats for a vote.

Pelosi said at a policy conference Tuesday that her “stock goes up” when President Donald Trump attacks her, as he did last week.

Trump lashed out at Pelosi while both were overseas commemorating the 75th anniversary of D-Day in Normandy. He called her “Nervous Nancy” after it was reported she privately told Democrats she’d rather see him voted out of office and “in prison” than impeached.

Pelosi said she never criticizes the president while abroad and won’t do so now because she’s “done with him.”

Dozens of House Democrats want Pelosi to start impeachment proceedings from the Trump-Russia report, but she prefers to conduct more investigations.

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12:30 a.m.

A resolution being voted on in the House would make it easier for Democrats to sue members of President Donald Trump’s administration and other potential witnesses who refuse to comply with subpoenas.

The House resolution being considered Tuesday would authorize lawsuits against Attorney General William Barr and former White House counsel Don McGahn for defying subpoenas pertaining to special counsel Robert Mueller’s report.

It would also empower committee chairmen to take legal action to enforce subpoenas in the future without a vote of the full House, so long as they have approval from a bipartisan group of House leaders.

The votes aren’t technically necessary, as Democrats already can go to court. But a House vote will give them increased standing if they do decide to file lawsuits.

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

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