The Latest: Pelosi warns Barr against 'obstructing Congress'

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WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on congressional investigations of President Donald Trump (all times local):

10:40 p.m.

President Donald Trump is suing Deutsche Bank and Capital One in an attempt to block congressional subpoenas for his business records.

The lawsuit by Trump, his sons Donald Jr. and Eric and his daughter Ivanka, was filed Monday in federal court in Manhattan. The Trump Organization and the Donald J. Trump Revocable Trust are among the other plaintiffs.

Two House committees subpoenaed Deutsche Bank and several other financial institutions earlier this month as part of investigations into Trump’s finances.

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House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff said at the time that the subpoenas were part of an investigation “into allegations of potential foreign influence on the U.S. political process.”

The Trumps want a federal judge to declare the subpoenas unlawful and enforceable. The lawsuit also seeks to block the financial institutions from disclosing information and complying with the subpoenas. The banks did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

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5:30 p.m.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says Attorney General William Barr will be “obstructing Congress” if he chooses not to appear before the House Judiciary Committee.

Barr is scheduled to testify Thursday about special counsel Robert Mueller’s report, but is resisting the committee’s push to have staffers conduct a round of questioning.

Pelosi says the attorney general or any other witnesses can’t “tell the committee how to conduct its interviews.”

She adds, “The attorney general of the United States is not the president’s personal lawyer, and he should act as the attorney general of the United States and honor his responsibilities.”

A redacted version of Mueller’s report was released to the public April 19. Democrats have subpoenaed the Justice Department for the full report and the underlying evidence.

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4:50 p.m.

House Democrats have been careful not to rush to impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump in the aftermath of Robert Mueller’s report, despite calls to do so by high-profile lawmakers and 2020 presidential contenders.

But as Congress resumes Monday, the Democratic oversight and investigations agenda is starting to look a lot like the groundwork that would be needed to launch an impeachment inquiry. At some point, it’s a political difference rather than a practical one.

The Judiciary Committee is scheduled to hear testimony from Attorney General William Barr on Thursday. The Oversight Committee has reached an agreement with the White House for testimony this week on security clearances. The Intelligence Committee is probing Trump’s financial dealings. And the Ways & Means Committee is pursuing Trump’s tax returns.

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

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