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The Latest: Smollett gave false information in 2007 case

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CHICAGO (AP) — The Latest on the attack reported by Jussie Smollett (all times local):

8:25 p.m.

A California misdemeanor complaint against Jussie Smollett shows the actor was accused of identifying himself as his younger brother in 2007 when a Los Angeles police officer pulled him over on suspicion of driving under the influence.

The misdemeanor complaint filed in Los Angeles Superior Court in September 2007 says that Smollett gave the name of his brother, Jake Smollett, when he was asked by an officer. He also signed a false name on the promise to appear in court. Smollett also was later charged with false impersonation, driving under the influence and driving without a valid license.

Court records show Smollett pleaded no contest to the reduced charge of giving false information, in addition to driving under the influence and driving without a valid license counts. The records show he later completed an alcohol education and treatment program and completed the terms of his sentence in May 2008.

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The details of the complaint were first reported by NBC News.

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4:50 p.m.

A Chicago police spokesman says two brothers who were arrested and later released from custody in connection with the attack reported by “Empire” actor Jussie Smollett have met with police and prosecutors at the courthouse.

Department spokesman Anthony Guglielmi said the meeting happened Tuesday in Chicago. He also said that officers have determined a tip that the two men may have been in an elevator with Smollett last month was not credible. He said video evidence helped them make that determination.

Smollett says two masked men hurled racial and homophobic slurs at him, beat him and looped a rope around his neck.

Last week, police announced that the “investigation had shifted” following interviews with the brothers and their release from custody without charges. Police have requested another interview with Smollett.

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12:10 p.m.

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Chicago police are investigating a tip that on the night “Empire” actor Jussie Smollett reported being attacked by two masked men he was in an elevator of his apartment building with two brothers later arrested and released from custody in the probe.

Department spokesman Anthony Guglielmi says the person who lives in the building or was visiting someone there reported seeing the three together the night last month that Smollett says two masked men hurled racial and homophobic slurs at him, beat him and looped a rope around his neck.

Guglielmi says police haven’t confirmed the person’s account. Detectives plan to interview the person on Tuesday.

Last week, police announced that the “investigation had shifted” following interviews with the brothers and their release from custody without charges. Police have requested another interview with Smollett.

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

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