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White House looking into Acosta role in sex abuse plea deal

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WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House said Friday it’s “looking into” Labor Secretary Alex Acosta’s handling of a secret plea deal with a wealthy financier accused of sexually abusing dozens of underage girls

A federal judge ruled Thursday that prosecutors in Florida violated the rights of victims by reaching the non-prosecution agreement with Jeffrey Epstein. Acosta was the Miami U.S. attorney who oversaw the arrangement.

President Donald Trump said he didn’t know much about the case but volunteered that Acosta has done “a great job” as labor secretary. As for the Epstein case, Trump added, “That seems like a long time ago”

Trump’s spokeswoman, Sarah Sanders, called it a “complicated case.” She added that it was “something we’re certainly looking into, but that they made the best possible decision and deal they could have gotten at that time.”

Asked if Trump still had confidence in Acosta, Sanders said: “Again, we’re looking into the matter. I’m not aware of any changes.”

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Acosta has called the deal appropriate.

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

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