Witness dies before testifying in fatal warehouse fire trial

Combined Shape

OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — A key witness scheduled to testify this week in the involuntary manslaughter trial involving a Northern California warehouse fire that killed 36 people has died in a car crash, prosecutors told a judge Monday.

Alameda County prosecutors had planned to call Robert Jacobitz to testify this week in the trial of Derick Almena and Max Harris, each charged with 36 counts of involuntary manslaughter in connection with the Dec. 2, 2016, fire in an Oakland warehouse during an unpermitted music concert.

Prosecutors say they turned the warehouse into an unsafe entertainment venue and residence.

Alameda County deputy district attorney Casey Bates told jurors last week that Jacobitz was an unlicensed contractor who performed inexpensive work at the warehouse soon after Almena rented it in November 2013.

Prosecutors allege that Almena, 49, stuffed it full of highly flammable furniture, pianos and other material and failed to provide smoke detectors, fire alarms, sprinklers and other required safety equipment. Prosecutors say Harris, 29, helped Almena convert the warehouse, collect rent and schedule concerts.

Trending:
Here's Who Qualifies for Government to Pay for Their Internet

Bates said during opening statements last week that Almena turned to Jacobitz for inexpensive help with the warehouse’s conversion after another contractor told Almena it would cost at least $5,000 to install a fire door and new stairs to the second floor.

Prosecutors have also said Jacobitz performed electrical work at the warehouse.

Investigators looked closely at the warehouse’s electrical system before concluding the cause of the fire could not be determined.

Testimony in the involuntary manslaughter trial of Derick Almena and Max Harris started Monday in Oakland with a tearful mother of one of the victim’s telling the jury about her daughter’s last moments.

Carol Cidlik said she received a text from her 29-year-old daughter Nicole Siegrist at 11:23 p.m. on the night of the fire.

“I’m gonna die now,” Nicole texted her mother. Investigators said Siegrist and the 35 other victims all died of smoke inhalation minutes later.

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →






We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
Combined Shape
The Associated Press is an independent, not-for-profit news cooperative headquartered in New York City. Their teams in over 100 countries tell the world’s stories, from breaking news to investigative reporting. They provide content and services to help engage audiences worldwide, working with companies of all types, from broadcasters to brands.
The Associated Press was the first private sector organization in the U.S. to operate on a national scale. Over the past 170 years, they have been first to inform the world of many of history's most important moments, from the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and the bombing of Pearl Harbor to the fall of the Shah of Iran and the death of Pope John Paul.

Today, they operate in 263 locations in more than 100 countries relaying breaking news, covering war and conflict and producing enterprise reports that tell the world's stories.
Location
New York City




Conversation