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Witnesses Describe Suspect's Odd Behavior Before the Unthinkable Happens on NYC Subway

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Police searching for an unidentified man who shot and killed another passenger on a moving New York City subway train asked for the public’s help Monday.

“We need all eyes on this,” NYPD Commissioner Keechant Sewell tweeted. She posted two surveillance camera photographs of the unidentified suspect, a burly man dressed in a hoodie on a hot day.

The shooter fled after the Q train arrived at the Canal Street station in Manhattan late Sunday morning.

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He shot and killed 48-year-old Daniel Enriquez, of Brooklyn, who was reportedly heading to brunch.

Enriquez had worked for Goldman Sachs’ global investment research division since 2013.

Goldman chair and CEO David Solomon said that Enriquez was a dedicated and beloved employee and that the company was devastated. Enriquez “epitomized our culture of collaboration and excellence,” Solomon said in a prepared statement.

Mayor Eric Adams said Monday that investigators had few leads and called the shooting “unimaginable.”

“You’re sitting down, going to brunch, going to visit a family member, a person walks up to you and shoots you for no reason,” Adams said. “That is the worst nightmare.”

There were no police officers on the train car where the shooting occurred, he said, and the city will evaluate how it is deploying officers across the sprawling subway system.

Witnesses told police the gunman was pacing the last car of the train “and without provocation, pulled out a gun and fired it at the victim at close range,” NYPD Chief of Department Kenneth Corey told reporters Sunday.

The shooting came more than a month after a man opened fire inside a Brooklyn subway train, scattering random shots that wounded 10 people. The person charged in that attack, Frank James, had posted dozens of online videos ranting about race, violence and his struggles with mental illness.

The Western Journal has reviewed this Associated Press story and may have altered it prior to publication to ensure that it meets our editorial standards.

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