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Catholic Bishop Warns Faithful About Hillary Clinton: 'Please Don't Listen to This Evil Woman'

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When a presumably sane person makes an objectively insane statement, it’s hard to know how to respond. (Some of you may have experienced that very thing around the table at Thanksgiving a couple of weeks ago.)

So when former first lady Hillary Clinton, whom I assume to be of right mind, equates rape as a tactic in warfare with protecting unborn babies, I was frankly at a loss.

Enter Bishop Joseph Strickland of the Diocese of Tyler, Texas, who had just the words I was looking for.

“Please, please don’t listen to this evil woman,” he tweeted Friday evening over a picture of Clinton. “Her lies and immorality need to be silenced for the good of humanity.”

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Strickland, who has something of a reputation for calling out leftist politicians for their evil (that’s a strong word, I know, but it aptly describes most leftist policy), was responding to comments Clinton made the previous day during an interview with Christiane Amanpour on PBS’s “Amanpour and Company.”

“[W]e are also in a period of time where there is a lot of pushback, and much of the progress that has been, I think, taken for granted by too many people is under attack — literally under attack in places like Iran or Afghanistan or Ukraine where rape is a tactic of war, or under attack by political and cultural forces in a country like our own when it comes to women’s health care and bodily autonomy.”

There’s a lot of jargon and leftist dog-whistling going on there, so let me translate into the vernacular: Women’s bodies in war-torn countries are under attack by soldiers who rape them, and they’re also under attack in the United States by citizens who don’t want to allow them to murder their babies.

Should the faithful be wary of listening to Hillary Clinton?

I can’t begin to describe the false equivalency Clinton is positing here, or the thinking that underlies it. “Evil” is a pretty good summary. (I’d call it “deplorable,” but I’m not sure she’d catch the irony.)

Speaking of irony, the PBS interview is viewable only by subscribers — I guess the P in PBS stands for “paywall” now — but you can see the pertinent video clip at LifeNews.

Bishop Stickland’s tweet engendered thousands of likes and retweets, as well as replies that were overwhelmingly positive — though not unanimously positive, of course. We’re talking about Twitter here, after all.

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In addition, there were a few who — reasonably, in my opinion — suggested the bishop be a little more careful with his language.

I don’t know if I’d go that far, but, especially given all that’s gone on at Twitter in recent months, I would certainly support the pro-free-speech position here, even if that speech is evil.

Can’t argue with that. And however history judges Hillary Clinton, I know she’ll one day face a greater judgment even than that. “I tell you, on the day of judgment people will give account for every careless word they speak, 37 for by your words you will be justified, and by your words you will be condemned,” Jesus told His followers.

Clinton needs to heed the warning. So does Strickland. So do we all.

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George Upper is the former Editor-in-Chief of The Western Journal and was a weekly co-host of "WJ Live," powered by The Western Journal. He is currently a contributing editor in the areas of faith, politics and culture. A former U.S. Army special operator, teacher and consultant, he is a lifetime member of the NRA and an active volunteer leader in his church. Born in Foxborough, Massachusetts, he has lived most of his life in central North Carolina.
George Upper, is the former editor-in-chief of The Western Journal and is now a contributing editor in the areas of faith, politics and culture. He currently serves as the connections pastor at Awestruck Church in Greensboro, North Carolina. He is a former U.S. Army special operator, teacher, manager and consultant. Born in Massachusetts, he graduated from Foxborough High School before joining the Army and spending most of the next three years at Fort Bragg. He holds bachelor's and master's degrees in English as well as a Master's in Business Administration, all from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. He and his wife life only a short drive from his three children, their spouses and his grandchildren. He is a lifetime member of the NRA and in his spare time he shoots, reads a lot of Lawrence Block and John D. MacDonald, and watches Bruce Campbell movies. He is a fan of individual freedom, Tommy Bahama, fine-point G-2 pens and the Oxford comma.
Birthplace
Foxborough, Massachusetts
Nationality
American
Honors/Awards
Beta Gamma Sigma
Education
B.A., English, UNCG; M.A., English, UNCG; MBA, UNCG
Location
North Carolina
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Faith, Business, Leadership and Management, Military, Politics




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