Commentary

Chick-fil-A Gives Back to Active Military Members Who Can't Make It to the Big Game

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If you’re an Army booster and you’re into football, Saturday was a good day for you. That’s because West Point handily took care of the Naval Academy in a 17-10 game that wasn’t really as close as the score might indicate. (No offense, Midshipmen.)

The victory was the Black Knights’ third in a row in the Army-Navy game, one of America’s oldest traditional rivalries. The 119th edition was held in the traditional location of Philadelphia, the cradle of our democracy. It’s something that if you can do at least once, you should.

If you’re a serviceman, veteran or family member and you can’t, however, Chick-fil-A has you covered.

According to The Daily Caller, the fast-food chain, an official sponsor of the Army-Navy game, set up a pop-up store in Philly for those who have served and those who love them to watch the game with some good eats.

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“The Chick-fil-A partnership includes a pop-up restaurant in Philadelphia that will be part of an experiential watch party for military service men and women. Chick-fil-A will host active duty military, veterans and their families at the private event,” the restaurant said in a press release.

“The Chick-fil-A pop-up restaurant is designed to bring fans of rival football teams together by creating a shared table. Members of the military will attend the event to participate in spirited competition, a shared meal and a watch party.”

“Other activities include a card writing station to show military appreciation, giveaways, food and much more. Chick-fil-A will also be flying in Army and Navy veterans nominated by local franchise Operators located across the country to attend the pre-game ceremonies and the game.”

Do you think Chick-fil-A had the right idea here?

The company has plenty of good reasons to cater to veterans, beyond (of course) the obvious.

After all, Chick-fil-A’s founder, Truett Cathy, served in World War II. The restaurant is also listed as Indeed’s number two Top-Rated Workplaces for military veterans.

The game itself was notable for several things, apart from being another win for Army.

Among the 66,729 at Lincoln Financial Field was President Trump, who became the first sitting president to attend the game in seven years, according to The Washington Post.

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Trump even did the ceremonial coin toss. It came up tails, which at least one high point for Navy on the day. They ended up getting outgained by Army, 283 yards to 203 yards, including 222 to 127 on the ground. Army quarterback Kelvin Holmes Jr. rushed for 64 yards and scored both of the touchdowns for the Black Knights.

The win for Army also secures the Commander-in-Chief’s Trophy for the best football team among the service academies; the Black Knights beat the Air Force Academy 17-14 earlier in the season, securing the award for just the third time in the last 23 years.

As for 3-10 Navy, it capped off their worst season since a 2-10 2002 campaign.

“It’s been hard on all of us, on players, on coaches, on staff, on our school — we like to win,” Navy coach Ken Niumatalolo said. “We’ve been winning a lot of games. Losing sucks. Nobody likes to lose, and it’s been hard because our program hasn’t been accustomed to what’s happened this year.”

So, a hard day for Navy supporters. But nothing that a few chicken sandwiches won’t fix.

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C. Douglas Golden is a writer who splits his time between the United States and Southeast Asia. Specializing in political commentary and world affairs, he's written for Conservative Tribune and The Western Journal for four years.
C. Douglas Golden is a writer who splits his time between the United States and Southeast Asia. Specializing in political commentary and world affairs, he's written for Conservative Tribune and The Western Journal for four years. Aside from politics, he enjoys spending time with his wife, literature (especially British comic novels and modern Japanese lit), indie rock, coffee, Formula One and football (of both American and world varieties).
Birthplace
Morristown, New Jersey
Education
Catholic University of America
Languages Spoken
English, Spanish
Topics of Expertise
American Politics, World Politics, Culture




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