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List of Top Dem Presidential Candidates for 2020: 'None of the Above' Crushes Everyone Else

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The Democrat party is in trouble. As the dust settles from the 2018 midterm election, it’s apparent that while liberals can still win elections, they face an uphill battle in two short years — and that battle will be even more difficult without a clear leader.

While some pundits predicted a “blue wave” of widespread Democrat wins this past Tuesday, it didn’t really happen. Democrats did manage to re-take the House, but the GOP held on to significantly more seats than past incumbent parties in recent midterms.

At the same time, Republicans actually strengthened their hold on the Senate, a fact that could be vital for upcoming Supreme Court appointments.

Now, a new poll has revealed that in addition to all these struggles, none of the “big names” on the left are particularly exciting as presidential candidates.

A survey conducted by The Hill asked Democrat and independent voters which people they would support for president in 2020. It turns out that “nobody” is more appealing than anybody.

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“The survey, conducted among 680 registered voters who identified themselves as Democrats or independents, found that ‘none of the above’ was the most popular choice among potential 2020 challengers to President Trump,” that outlet reported.

Not so long ago, the Democrat party was seen as cool, young, and hip. Think about all those iconic HOPE posters of Barack Obama looking like a counter-cultural rebel.

Now think again, because that era is long gone. Instead, the leading names being floated to run in 2020 are mostly old, white, and grey.

“Twenty-five percent of respondents said (Joe) Biden would be their preferred nominee,” reported The Hill.

Do you think Republicans will keep the White House in 2018?

“(Bernie) Sanders, who ran in the Democratic presidential primary in 2016, came in second with 18 percent,” it continued. “Twelve percent of the independents and Democrats surveyed picked (Hillary) Clinton.”

There’s your oh-so-cool dream team for the 2020 Democrat comeback: A 75 year old, 77 year old, and 71 year old, respectively, all who have been part of the political establishment for many decades. No wonder so many liberals said “pass.”

Again, “none of the above” beat everyone else, with thirty percent of respondents rejecting every likely candidate.

A short list of “new faces” was also presented to liberal voters, but was widely rejected. The poll asked Democrats about California Senator Kamala Harris, New York billionaire Michael Bloomberg, and not-actually-a-Native-American Senator Elizabeth Warren.

Only four percent of respondents chose one of those “fresh” names as their top 2020 choice. Womp-womp. (Or as Elizabeth Warren might say, wampum-wampum.)

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The reality is that both parties have some serious work to do before the next presidential election. Republicans need to consolidate their various factions and get on the same page, which will almost certainly mean circling the wagons (nobody tell Fauxcahontas!) around President Trump.

Democrats need to do some serious soul-searching as well. Does the future of the party lie with dusty octogenarians or wild-eyed socialists like Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez?

There are two radically different visions being held up as liberalism, and nobody to unite Democrats. There seems to be no new Barack Obama, John F. Kennedy, or even Bill Clinton in sight. Maybe they can reanimate Lyndon Johnson and change his name to “Beto.”

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Benjamin Arie is an independent journalist and writer. He has personally covered everything ranging from local crime to the U.S. president as a reporter in Michigan before focusing on national politics. Ben frequently travels to Latin America and has spent years living in Mexico.




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