Share
News

Dr. Birx's Bombshell Vaccine Admission: I Knew Vaccines Wouldn't Protect Against Infection

Share

Former White House COVID response coordinator Dr. Deborah Birx has admitted that she knew COVID-19 vaccines would not prevent infection.

During the administration of President Joe Biden, intense pressure has been put on individuals to be vaccinated against the coronavirus on the grounds that they were group responsible for spreading the virus — a “pandemic of the unvaccinated,” as Biden has put it.

That philosophy underpinned vaccine mandates supported by the Biden administration that upended employers and the military.

Birx, the coordinator of the White House Coronavirus Task Force under former President Donald Trump, said faith that the vaccines created a wall of protection was misplaced – and she knew it.

Does what Dr. Deborah Birx said surprise you?

While she still pushed the vaccines as a measure of protection against severe illness, she told Fox News host Neil Cavuto on Friday’s “Your World” that vaccines are not perfect protection. The statement came when Cavuto asked Birx how unvaccinated Americans should feel after news that Biden — the chief promoter of vaccines — had become infected himself.

“I knew these vaccines were not going to protect against infection,” she told Cavuto.

“And I think we overplayed the vaccines, and it made people then worry that it’s not going to protect against severe disease and hospitalization,” she said.

Although noting that the vaccine does confer some protection from the virus, she added:  “Let’s be very clear: 50 percent of the people who died from the omicron surge were older, vaccinated.”

Birx is now backing a policy of testing and treatment, citing Paxlovid, the drug given to Biden last week after he tested positive for COVID-19.

“So that’s why I’m saying even if you’re vaccinated and boosted, if you’re unvaccinated right now, the key is testing and Paxlovid. It’s effective. It’s a great antiviral,” Birx told Cavuto.

“And really, that is what’s going to save your lives right now if you’re over 70, which if you look at the hospitalizations, hospitalizations are rising steadily with new admissions, particularly in those over 70,” she said.

Related:
Health Care Company Denied Religious Exemptions for COVID Vax, Now It's Going to Have to Pay Workers Millions

Birx cited one region for which she has a great concern.

“And so if you live in the South – I know people keep talking about the fall – I’m worried about the South,” she said.

Biden had been among the loudest voices pushing the claim that the vaccine would prevent transmission.

“This is a pandemic of the unvaccinated,” Biden said in December, according to PolitiFact. “The unvaccinated. Not the vaccinated, the unvaccinated. That’s the problem. Everybody talks about freedom and not to have a shot or have a test. Well guess what? How about patriotism? How about making sure that you’re vaccinated, so you do not spread the disease to anyone else.”

PolitiFact ruled that claim as “Mostly False.”

Bill Hanage, associate professor of epidemiology at Harvard, said Biden’s “statement is not accurate,” according to PolitiFact.

“We knew that vaccinated people could become infected with delta and shed viable virus in large amounts,” Hanage said.

Brooke Nichols, a health economist and infectious disease mathematical modeler at Boston University, said “vaccinated individuals can definitely infect other people. There is enough data to support this.”

“While vaccinated individuals may be less infectious and infectious for a shorter duration of time they are by no means a dead-end host,” Nichols said, according to PolitiFact.

Trending:
FBI Fraud: Agent Admits Guilt, Destroyed Evidence in Case Against Pro-Trump Lawmaker

“When calling it a ‘pandemic of the unvaccinated,’ though, it makes it sound as those vaccinated individuals aren’t substantially contributing to new cases — which they are [particularly now].”

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →



We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
, , ,
Share
Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack can be reached at jackwritings1@gmail.com.
Location
New York City
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Politics, Foreign Policy, Military & Defense Issues




Conversation