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Grab a Tissue Before You Watch 'Toys R Us' Boss Sing Goodbye Song to Employees

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“I don’t wanna grow up, I’m a Toys ‘R’ Us kid,” is the catchy jingle of the giant toy store, however, as the toy industry changes to mostly online, we might all have to grow up.

Sadly, the time is coming for Toys ‘R’ Us and their mascot Geoffrey the giraffe to say goodbye as stores across the country prepare to close.

On March 23, Toys ‘R’ Us locations in the U.S. started liquidation sales, according to Money magazine, and the sales are expected to end in June.

The toy industry as a whole will take a hit after the closing of the toy superstore. Lego has announced that, for the first time in 13 years, they have noticed a drop in sales.

In the technology age, kids simply aren’t playing with physical toys as much as they used to.

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One Toys ‘R’ Us warehouse manager created a sad, but funny twist on the company’s jingle in order to say goodbye to their store in Missouri.

Brad Douglas sang to his employees while holding a stuffed giraffe, the mascot Geoffrey.

“I didn’t wanna grow up. I wanted to stay a Toys ‘R’ Us kid,” his song began.

“But things have changed a bit since we’re being liquidated. The fun we’ve had with every year are times I’ll never forget.

“But it’s time to grow up so let’s finish with style. With Geoffrey by our side, we’ll send out every last smile.”

The city of Lee’s Summit, Missouri is working to try to help the 300 Toys ‘R’ Us employees at Douglas’ distribution center find new jobs.

CBS News reported that Toys ‘R’ Us rejected a bid from Isaac Larian, founder of toy company MGA Entertainment, to save some of its stores because the $890 million offer was far below the liquidation value of the 274 stores he offered to buy.

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“It is our hope and expectation that we can continue to participate in the bid process so we can keep fighting to save Toys ‘R’ Us,” Larian said.

It is still unclear if Larian will be successful in his mission to save Toys ‘R’ Us, but in the meantime, we all have to be prepared to say goodbye.

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Erin Coates was an editor for The Western Journal for over two years before becoming a news writer. A University of Oregon graduate, Erin has conducted research in data journalism and contributed to various publications as a writer and editor.
Erin Coates was an editor for The Western Journal for over two years before becoming a news writer. She grew up in San Diego, California, proceeding to attend the University of Oregon and graduate with honors holding a degree in journalism. During her time in Oregon, Erin was an associate editor for Ethos Magazine and a freelance writer for Eugene Magazine. She has conducted research in data journalism, which has been published in the book “Data Journalism: Past, Present and Future.” Erin is an avid runner with a heart for encouraging young girls and has served as a coach for the organization Girls on the Run. As a writer and editor, Erin strives to promote social dialogue and tell the story of those around her.
Birthplace
Tucson, Arizona
Nationality
American
Honors/Awards
Graduated with Honors
Education
Bachelor of Arts in Journalism, University of Oregon
Books Written
Contributor for Data Journalism: Past, Present and Future
Location
Prescott, Arizona
Languages Spoken
English, French
Topics of Expertise
Politics, Health, Entertainment, Faith




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