In Middle of MSNBC Report On Trump Wall, Camera Catches Illegal Immigrants Hopping Border Fence

Nn MSNBC reporter got an insider’s view Monday of the daily challenges facing U.S. Border Patrol agents who are tasked with preventing illegal immigrants from entering the country.

Reporter Jacob Soboroff was on camera at the U.S.-Mexico border near San Diego, California, discussing with an unidentified Border Patrol agent the wall prototypes under construction, when a group of illegal aliens came over the existing fence.

“What happened?” Soboroff asked as agents on horseback approached the fence-jumpers, who surrendered to the agents, according to a Fox News report. “The people are crossing!”

While narrating his report, Soboroff said, “Almost on cue, a group of asylum-seekers, migrants not from Mexico, jumped over the existing fence to turn themselves in to border agents on horseback.”

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“It’s like, a small group of three people jumped over in the middle of the day. There’s a girl there in a pink backpack,” he told the agent.

“Can you explain to me what’s going on?” Soboroff asked.

The agent then told him that he was witnessing “the reality of everyday border enforcement.”

“The United States is still the draw, the ultimate draw, for people that have dire situations where they’re at,” the agent said.

He also predicted that border patrol is “going to continue to witness this,” noting that “it plays out on a regular basis for us.”

“And it did here just now,” Soboroff added.

Eight border wall prototypes are currently being constructed along the remote stretch of the U.S.-Mexico border where the MSNBC interview took place.

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According to NPR, “Customs and Border Protection is paying $20 million to six construction companies from Mississippi, Maryland, Alabama, Texas and Arizona” to complete the prototypes by the end of October. U.S. Customs and Border Control will then evaluate the walls based on specific criteria.

“We want a better barrier. One that is hard to scale, hard to penetrate and hard to tunnel under,” Roy Villareal, chief of the San Diego Border Patrol sector, told NPR. “We’re hoping innovation from private industry combined with our experience generates the next evolution of border security infrastructure.”

About a half-dozen illegal immigrants have reportedly been caught while attempting to cross amid the construction.