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Kamala's Dad: 'My Grandmother and Parents Must be Turning in Their Graves' over Kamala Comments He Despises

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Liberals often falsely accuse conservatives of “racism” and “stereotyping,” but Democratic Sen. Kamala Harris was slammed by her own father for pushing stereotypes about Jamaicans.

After Harris announced her decision to run for president in late January, she began the typical media rounds of wannabe candidates.

In an attempt to get away from her image as a frigid politician, Harris visited the New York-based syndicated radio show “The Breakfast Club” last week and opened up about her experience with marijuana.

Harris told radio host “Charlamagne tha God” (host Lenard Larry McKelvey) that she’s in favor of legalizing marijuana and admitted to smoking the drug before.

But the Democratic senator strangely cited her ethnicity as part of the reason for her stance on marijuana.

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“Half my family’s from Jamaica. Are you kidding me?” she said.

That’s an absurd comment from a far-left Democrat who hasn’t held back in accusing others of “racism” in the past.

Should Harris apologize?

Don’t get me wrong. I’m not attempting to accuse Harris of “racism” here — that’s a play from the left’s handbook.

But I do expect liberals to play by their own rules, and they should be called out when they don’t.

Thankfully, Harris was called out, and it was her own father, Stanford University economics Professor Donald Harris, who did the calling.

In a statement to Jamaica Global Online last week, Harris slammed his daughter’s “fraudulent stereotype.”

“My dear departed grandmother … as well as my deceased parents, must be turning in their grave right now to see their family’s name, reputation and proud Jamaican identity being connected, in any way, jokingly or not, with the fraudulent stereotype of a pot-smoking joy seeker and in the pursuit of identity politics,” he said.

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Cannabis is actually illegal in Jamaica and decriminalized for small amounts, which means the island nation is stricter on marijuana than several states in the United States.

“Speaking for myself and my immediate Jamaican family, we wish to categorically dissociate ourselves from this travesty,” Donald Harris said.

As Jamaica Global reported, some Jamaicans became concerned after Harris’ comment, with the fear that they might be unfairly targeted for drug tests after Harris gave more attention to the stereotype.

“(T)he perception created by Ms. Harris’ statement is real and has caused some unease amongst Jamaicans at home and in the diaspora and now, it seems, her father and his Jamaican family,” the Jamaican outlet reported.

“For some, it is more than mere unease; one Jamaican commenting on social media expressed the concern that ‘soon my job will be singling me out to drug test me since I am from Jamaica. What a stereotype.’ Her concern is not unfounded given the experience of Jamaicans travelling to US ports having sniffer dogs around them in customs halls.”

Harris couldn’t follow the left’s most basic politically correct rule — to avoid potentially racist stereotypes.

And now her family is ashamed.

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Malachi Bailey is a writer from Ohio with a background in history, education and philosophy. He has led multiple conservative groups and is dedicated to the principles of free speech, privacy and peace.
Malachi Bailey is a writer from Ohio with a passion for free speech, privacy and peace. He graduated from the College of Wooster with a B.A. in History. While at Wooster, he served as the Treasurer for the Wooster Conservatives and the Vice President for the Young Americans for Liberty.
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Politics, History




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