Commentary

Kanye's Christian Response to Kim Kardashian's 'Too Sexy' Dress Is Breath of Fresh Air in Sex-Obsessed Hollywood

You wouldn’t expect that a moment of a spouse’s all-too-Christian concern about his wife playing into sex-obsessed Hollywood’s standards of objectification would appear on “Keeping up with the Kardashians,” but that’s what happened Sunday.

Kim Kardashian West got a lot of attention for the dress she wore to the 2019 Met Gala, which was designed by Thiery Mugler and reportedly took eight months to make.

The New York Post’s Elana Fishman summed it up pretty well when she said the fashion mogul and reality television star’s dress “may have broken the internet with its impossibly waist-cinching corset and ‘dripping wet’ look.”

Kanye West, Kardashian’s husband, had issues with how the dress sexualized his wife — issues he aired in a discussion featured on Sunday’s show on E! Entertainment.

“I just went through this transition from being a rapper, looking at all these girls and looking at my wife, like, ‘Oh, my girl needs to be just like the other girls showing her body off,’” West said during an on-screen dispute with his wife.

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“I didn’t realize that that was affecting my soul and my spirit as someone that’s married and the father of now … about to be four kids,” he said.

“A corset is a form of underwear. It’s hot. For who, though?” West added.

His wife wasn’t impressed by West’s objections.

“So the night before the Met you’re going to come in here and say that you’re not into a corset vibe?” she responded.

“You’re giving me really bad anxiety. … You knew last night I was having really bad anxiety and I don’t need any more negative energy, for you to say you’re now not into me wearing a tight dress.”

“You are my wife, and it affects me when pictures are too sexy,” West said.

“You built me up to be this sexy person and confidence and all this stuff, and just because you’re on a journey and transformation doesn’t mean I’m in the same spot with you,” Kardashian said.

West then walked out.

The media rushed to Kardashian’s side in this disagreement.

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“Dictating what your partner can and can’t wear isn’t a good look,” The Girls Next Door from Men’s Health tweeted.

Except, of course, he didn’t dictate anything, since he appeared next to her the next night on the red carpet to the Met Gala.

Fishman said that Kardashian “quickly put West in his place.” People’s headline about the kerfuffle said the same thing.

The point of marriage, I thought, was that it was supposed to be a partnership. If Kim had pushed back on some of Kanye’s more iffy lyrics back in the day, would the media have said West’s pushback would have “quickly put Kardashian in her place?” No, because that would be stupid and offensive. The same can rightly be said of a husband expressing doubt over his wife’s sexualization for the purposes of media exposure.

Now, the question is worth asking: Was this fight staged? So much on “Keeping up with the Kardashians” is, after all. It’s a reality show inasmuch as it takes place and is filmed within our reality — as opposed to, say, being animated or taking place within an existential void that’s not part of our universe.

However, one can assume that this is legitimately something Kanye feels, particularly given his turn toward the Christian faith.

Take this comment from West in 2016 on Kardashian: “I love her nude selfies. Like, I love the ones from the side, the back ones, and the front. I just love seeing her naked; I love nudity. And I love beautiful shapes. I feel like it’s almost a Renaissance thing, a painting, a modern version of a painting. I think it’s important for Kim to have her figure. To not show it would be like Adele not singing.”

His comment on her dress is a significantly different take on the media’s sexualization of his wife — and it’s a welcome one.

Kardashian is right about one thing: West is “on a journey and transformation.” During his “Sunday Service” performances, he’s acknowledged that God calls “for radical obedience” to Him. Part of that radical obedience can be seen in 2 Corinthians 12:21:

“I fear that when I come again my God may humble me before you, and I may have to mourn over many of those who sinned earlier and have not repented of the impurity, sexual immorality, and sensuality that they have practiced.”

You either get it or you don’t.

Most people in the media and Hollywood don’t — and that shouldn’t be a surprise. To them, the transformative power of the Holy Spirit is a nice fairy tale.

It’s becoming increasingly evident that for Kanye, it’s very real.

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C. Douglas Golden is a writer who splits his time between the United States and Southeast Asia. Specializing in political commentary and world affairs, he's written for Conservative Tribune and The Western Journal since 2014.
C. Douglas Golden is a writer who splits his time between the United States and Southeast Asia. Specializing in political commentary and world affairs, he's written for Conservative Tribune and The Western Journal since 2014. Aside from politics, he enjoys spending time with his wife, literature (especially British comic novels and modern Japanese lit), indie rock, coffee, Formula One and football (of both American and world varieties).
Birthplace
Morristown, New Jersey
Education
Catholic University of America
Languages Spoken
English, Spanish
Topics of Expertise
American Politics, World Politics, Culture




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