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Police Officer Buys Hungry Age 10 Boy Food at McDonald's Moments Before Being Fatally Shot

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For San Diego Police Department officer and Marine Corps. veteran Jeremy Henwood, his last action showed he had a highly generous soul. Henwood had stopped at a McDonald’s on Aug. 7, 2011.

Perhaps he’d wanted a cup of coffee or a serving of fries. But what he found was a situation that would sadden anyone who was even slightly sympathetic to others.

According to KNSD, a young man named Daveon Scott was trying to pay for cookies. Only once he got to the front of the line, he realized he didn’t have enough cash.

We’ve all seen that situation, haven’t we? Someone in a public setting finds himself horribly embarrassed, and we all shuffle our feet and look away.

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Only Henwood didn’t do that at all. Instead, he whipped out his wallet and paid for Scott’s snack right then and there.

Surveillance footage shows Henwood smiling and chatting with the boy. On film, he tells Scott to work hard and then leaves.

That simple action would prove to be one of the last things he ever did.

The Daily Mail reported that 23-year-old Dejon Marquee encountered Henwood not long after the officer had left the McDonald’s and was sitting in his cruiser. White had penned a suicide note and gone out driving in his car.

White flashed his lights at the police cruiser and pulled alongside it. Then he shoved a gun out the window and opened fire.

Henwood was mortally wounded and died later at the hospital. But White didn’t get away with his crimes.

Officers caught up with him later. He perished in the ensuing firefight.

You might think that Henwood’s life ended tragically, and that final cookie-purchasing act made no real difference in the end.

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But years later, Scott said that Henwood’s simple kindness impacted his life, saying, “It changed my perspective on policemen. I used to not like policemen. Now I don’t think they’re bad. We need them.”

After learning of the officer’s passing, Scott was devastated.

“I couldn’t believe it,” he said. “I’m sad he had to go.”

“I know he’s looking down on me right now, shaking his head like, ‘You’re a good kid, man,’” he continued.

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A graduate of Wheaton College with a degree in literature, Loren also adores language. He has served as assistant editor for Plugged In magazine and copy editor for Wildlife Photographic magazine.
A graduate of Wheaton College with a degree in literature, Loren also adores language. He has served as assistant editor for Plugged In magazine and copy editor for Wildlife Photographic magazine. Most days find him crafting copy for corporate and small-business clients, but he also occasionally indulges in creative writing. His short fiction has appeared in a number of anthologies and magazines. Loren currently lives in south Florida with his wife and three children.
Education
Wheaton College
Location
Florida
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Entertainment, Faith, Travel




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