Share
Commentary

Polling Hell: Rasmussen Delivers Horrifically Bad Results to Hillary

Share

Failed Democrat nominee Hillary Clinton lost the 2016 election to Republican Donald Trump in spectacular fashion, and neither she nor a significant number of those on the left has been able to come to grips with that brutal reality for them just yet.

Indeed, there has recently been rumors swirling that Clinton might make yet another run at the presidency in a 2020 electoral rematch against Trump, but the prospect of Clinton being the Democrat Party’s nominee once again is not sitting well with an overwhelming majority of likely Democrat voters, according to The Daily Wire.

As was revealed in a recent Rasmussen poll, some 73 percent of Democrat voters want the party to nominate a “fresh face” in 2020 while only a mere 16 percent thought the party should nominate someone who has already run in the past, such as Clinton, former Vice President Joe Biden or socialist Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders.

By way of comparison, only 36 percent of Democrats were calling for a “fresh face” in 2016, though a remarkably high 21 percent were undecided on whether Democrats should go with someone new or stick with tried and true candidates from the past.

To that end, the poll showed that only about 33 percent of Democrats think Clinton has been “good” for the party overall while 39 percent think she has been detrimental. The feeling that Clinton has been bad for the Democrat Party is unsurprisingly shared by 72 percent of Republicans, but as stated by Rasmussen, “more worrisome for Democrats, 63% of voters not affiliated with either major party feel Clinton has been bad for the party,” as well.

Trending:
China Won't Like What Just Decided to Take an Extended Stay Around Taiwan

Ironically, given her obsessive focus on gender issues and the female vote, women voters are more strongly in favor of a “fresh face” for Democrats than male voters are, which pretty much undermines Clinton’s supposed widespread feminist base of support.

Hilariously, even among the third of Democrat voters who still think that Clinton has been good for the party, nearly two-thirds of them (62 percent) still suggest that Democrats should nominate a “fresh face” in 2020, a sentiment shared by 67 percent of Democrats who feel Clinton has been bad for the party overall.

The slumping popularity of Clinton among Democrats appears rather stark when compared with polls in prior years that showed her as being a much more popular figure, such as a 2015 Rasmussen poll that showed Clinton was viewed favorably by 48 percent of all voters.

However, that 48 percent in March of 2015 was down from the 53 percent favorable rating she held in September 2014, which in turn had dropped from the 61 percent favorable rating she enjoyed when she stepped down as secretary of state near the end of 2012.

Are you glad to see that even most Democrats have grown tired of Hillary Clinton?

Perhaps adding insult to injury, a Rasmussen poll released in June of this year revealed that only 40 percent of all voters believed the country would be better off if Clinton had won the 2016 election instead of Trump, with 47 percent disagreeing with that notion and 13 percent remaining undecided on that choice.

In a breakdown of those numbers, roughly two-thirds of Democrats and Republicans split to their separate corners and believed their 2016 candidate would do the best, but unaffiliated independents rejected Clinton as the better option for the country by a two-to-one margin, 54-28 percent.

As an aside, that poll showed that Trump held a 46 percent job approval rating and some 43 percent of voters believed the country was “headed in the right direction,” a belief that former President Barack Obama was only able to garner support in the mid-20s for during his final year in office.

That particular poll also shockingly revealed that most voters weren’t buying Clinton’s litany of excuses for why she lost the election and simply wanted her to go away, with an astonishingly low 32 percent of voters who still believed that Clinton had obtained the 2016 Democrat Party nomination in a “fair” manner — meaning two-thirds have accepted the notion that she and the party cheated Sanders out of a potential nomination in the party’s primary.

Back to the most recent Rasmussen poll, where they admitted that more voters are expressing their support for Trump’s presidency and believe that impeachment of Trump is not the best strategy for Democrats to run on in upcoming election cycles.

Related:
State Board Unanimously Recognizes Small Political Party, Now the Democrats Who Tried to Sabotage It Are in for a Fight

Indeed, it appears voters have grown increasingly weary of the incessant Trump bashing emanating from Hollywood and the media, and few voters think that constant negativity will pay dividends for Democrats come election day.

All of that said, it is quite evident that there is exceptionally little support among anyone for yet another presidential run by Hillary Clinton, but if she’s game to try again, Trump and Republicans certainly won’t argue against the opportunity to defeat her once more, perhaps even more decisively than in 2016.

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →



We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
, , , ,
Share
Ben Marquis is a writer who identifies as a constitutional conservative/libertarian. He has written about current events and politics for The Western Journal since 2014. His focus is on protecting the First and Second Amendments.
Ben Marquis has written on current events and politics for The Western Journal since 2014. He reads voraciously and writes about the news of the day from a conservative-libertarian perspective. He is an advocate for a more constitutional government and a staunch defender of the Second Amendment, which protects the rest of our natural rights. He lives in Little Rock, Arkansas, with the love of his life as well as four dogs and four cats.
Birthplace
Louisiana
Nationality
American
Education
The School of Life
Location
Little Rock, Arkansas
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Politics




Conversation