Quadruplets Each Enlist in a Different Branch of the Military

Combined Shape

A set of Michigan quadruplets have all been moved by the call to serve, and will be joining different branches of the military after high school.

“We’ve been really close-knit but I think it’s going to be good for us,” Rose Lees of Ada, Michigan, said Friday during an appearance on Today. “I’m personally sad, I don’t know about them.”

Rose Lees enlisted in the Air Force. Through her ROTC program, she will attend Eastern Michigan University for emergency medicine.

Her three brothers will be taking other roads.

Bryce Lees is joining the Navy. Mason Lees is serving in the Air National Guard. Nevin Lees, who graduated early from high school, has already enlisted in the Marine Corps, and plans to go to college as part of his path to becoming an officer.

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A fifth sibling, Yoel Lees, is also entering the Marines.

“Ever since I was little I’ve always wanted to serve,” said Rose Lees, whose ultimate career goal is to serve with Doctors Without Borders, WVEC reported. “I just want to help out our world.”

Bryce Lees said that his decision was influenced by the fact that his grandfather and brother-in-law also served in the military.

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Nick Lees said he and his wife, Lyvonne, fully support their children.

“I couldn’t be any more proud,” Nick said. “They’re a great example for their peers, and even for our generation.”

Rose Lees said that as she leaves high school, she has learned that being young is not a barrier to making a difference.

“Don’t take the time that you have for granted,” she said. “People may think that they really can’t make a change because we’re so young and that we don’t have a say. But we actually have the biggest impact out there.”

Her brother, Mason Lees, said that although the siblings have friends their own age, they also bonded with their teachers, according to WXMI.

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“We have friends but we like to make deeper connections with I’d say our teachers,” he said.

“We kind of just get to know our teachers a lot better and get the connections. You don’t realize people’s lives are a lot different: they actually have stuff going on, not just grade our papers and stuff, they’re actual people.”

The family dynamics have contributed to the open perspectives of the children. In addition to their own children, the Lees family — which has 12 children in all — has several children adopted from Ethiopia.

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Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack can be reached at jackwritings1@gmail.com.
Location
New York City
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Politics, Foreign Policy, Military & Defense Issues




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