Arizona Congressman’s Resignation Effective Immediately After Wife Suddenly Rushed to Hospital

Update: Arizona Republican Rep. Trent Franks announced Friday that he is resigning from Congress, effective immediately, one day after saying that he would relinquish his seat in early 2018.

“Last night, my wife was admitted to the hospital in Washington, D.C. due to an ongoing ailment,” he said in a statement, according to Axios.

“After discussing options with my family, we came to the conclusion that the best thing for our family now would be for me to tender my previous resignation effective today, December 8th, 2017.”

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Update: Rep. Trent Franks, R-Ariz., announced his resignation on Thursday.

“I have recently learned that the (House) Ethics Committee is reviewing an inquiry regarding my discussion of surrogacy with two previous female subordinates, making each feel uncomfortable,” he said in a statement, according to Politico. “I deeply regret that my discussion of this option and process in the workplace caused distress.”

Franks recounted in the statement that he and his wife successfully had a surrogate mother carry twins for them, but had since struggled finding another surrogate to carry a hoped-for sibling for their twins.

“We are in an unusual moment in history – there is a collective focus on a very important problem of justice and sexual impropriety. It is so important that we get this right for everyone, especially for victims,” Franks added.

“But in the midst of this current cultural and media climate, I am deeply convinced I would be unable to complete a fair House Ethics investigation before distorted and sensationalized versions of this story would put me, my family, my staff, and my noble colleagues in the House of Representatives through hyperbolized public excoriation,” he said.

Franks also told The Washington Times, he never molested or inappropriately touched a female staff member. He has not been accused of any sexual misconduct.

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Arizona Republican Rep. Trent Franks is expected to announce his resignation on Thursday.

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Franks told Roll Call, “We will have a statement a little bit later, but that’s all I can tell you right now.”

“The statement will explain,” he added.

Roll Call stated it was unclear why Franks would be leaving office.

The outlet reported that the conservative congressman had been gearing up for a 2012 U.S. Senate run, but abruptly canceled those plans.

“There’s been rumors swirling around him for years, at least in 2012,” an Arizona Republican told Roll Call.

“And if this turns out to be true, there won’t be that many people who are surprised,” the Republican continued.

MSNBC Capitol Hill correspondent Kasie Hunt reported that there are potentially allegations of “inappropriate behavior,” but it was still too early to confirm.

“We’ll see what the details of this turn out to be,” she added.

Franks, 60, was first elected to the House in 2002.

Franks serves on the House Armed Services and and Judiciary Committees.

The representative is a member of the conservative “Freedom Caucus.”

The 8th Congressional District, which he represents, is on the northwest side of Phoenix and went for Donald Trump by 21 points in 2016, according to Politico.

Franks was mentioned as a potential candidate to fill Sen. Jeff Flake’s seat following his announcement in October that he would not seek re-election.

Last month, Franks decided against a run telling USA Today, “There may be some opportunity for me in the future maybe not, but I won’t be brokenhearted either way.”

According to Politico and other sources, several names have already been mentioned as potential special election candidates, including former Maricopa County Supervisor Clint Hickman, Peoria Mayor Cathy Carlat, state Sen. Debbie Lesko and state Sen. Kimberly Yee, political commentator Floyd Brown and former state senator Lori Klein.

An Arizona Republican political consultant told The Western Journal, top contenders would be Arizona treasurer and Trump campaign COO Jeff DeWit, Trump campaign 2016 statewide chairman and former state representative Phil Lovas, as well as state senator and Franks congressional staff member Steve Montenegro.

The consultant added if Trump were to endorse anyone that would likely be enough to decide the race in what is expected to be a crowded field, with low voter turnout.

The special election will likely take place in April or May, according to the consultant.

This post was last modified on March 15, 2018, 5:09 pm