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School District Takes Defiant Stand, Will Proudly Display 'In God We Trust' for All To See

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A school district in Alabama will be proudly displaying the nation’s motto, “In God We Trust,” despite the constant assaults on Christianity and American history from the left.

The Cullman County school board last week unanimously approved a resolution to display “In God We Trust” in county schools, according to WVTM-TV.

The motto will greet students when they walk into the front office of all schools in the county’s system.

This is a bold act by any local government in a time when liberals are trying everything they can to separate school children from any semblance of Christianity.

This attack on Christianity is probably best symbolized by Engel v. Vitale court case, the 1962 Supreme Court decision that eliminated prayer from public school unless it was voluntary or student led.

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But in the present day, even prayer sessions that seem to be compliant with the strict laws are under attack.

In February, an Ohio school district ceased prayer sessions before football games because they were challenged by a far-left atheist nonprofit called Freedom From Religion Foundation, according to the Alliance, Ohio, paper The Alliance Review.

However, the phrase “In God We Trust” also has deep historical meaning outside of its religious connotations. According to the Treasury Department, it first appeared on U.S. two-cent coins in 1864 — while the Civil War was raging. Its use on currency was sporadic after that until, in 1956, it was declared the national motto by a joint resolution of Congress. It has been on U.S. currency since 1957.

Cullman County Superintendent Shane Barnette stressed the importance of the motto’s historical meaning.

Do you agree with the school district's decision to display the U.S. motto?

“Some people may disagree with it, but the Legislature voted to allow it,” Barnette said according to The Cullman Times. “I think it’s important for students to know the history and how this came about in our nation’s early years.”

The motto is heavily ingrained in our country. In addition to it being the official motto, it also appear on coinage, some state license plates, and in government buildings.

Unfortunately, the prevalence of the motto doesn’t mean the left hasn’t tried attacking it in the past.

In August, the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in St. Paul, Minnesota rejected an appeal from atheist groups claiming the motto is unconstitutional, according to Reuters.

One of the lawyers involved in making the appeal, Michael Newdow, had also unsuccessfully challenged the U.S. Pledge of Allegiance for using the phrase “under God.”

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The left isn’t limited to erasing mottos and phrases. They also attempt to topple statutes representing pieces of American History.

For example, a left-wing group in New Orleans seeks to topple statues of Henry Clay and President Andrew Jackson, according to WVUE-DT.

And liberals will probably not be happy with the Cullman County school board’s decision either.

The Cullman County school district is taking a bold stance by proudly displaying the phrase “In God We Trust.”

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Malachi Bailey is a writer from Ohio with a background in history, education and philosophy. He has led multiple conservative groups and is dedicated to the principles of free speech, privacy and peace.
Malachi Bailey is a writer from Ohio with a passion for free speech, privacy and peace. He graduated from the College of Wooster with a B.A. in History. While at Wooster, he served as the Treasurer for the Wooster Conservatives and the Vice President for the Young Americans for Liberty.
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Politics, History




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