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Stephen A. Smith Scorched After Proving He Doesn't Watch College Football

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Every so often, it is an inevitable part of sports journalism that we slip up on a fact, formulate a take based on limited information, or otherwise make a flub, since there are only 24 hours in a day to read articles, watch games and keep up on the news.

Best-case scenario, the editor gets to it and you, the reader, never see the mistake because it’s corrected before it ever gets published.

Worst-case scenario, journalists are allowed to speak unfiltered without doing due diligence and pick up a reputation for scorching hot takes with absolutely no basis in reality.

Which brings us to Stephen A. Smith of ESPN, who alongside Max Kellerman makes daily morning entertainment out of dumb hot takes on “First Take.”

On Friday’s edition, Smith was in on the discussion about whether Oklahoma’s Kyler Murray or Ohio State’s Dwayne Haskins would make a better prospect in April’s NFL draft.

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There are plenty of angles you could take. You could talk about Murray’s flirtation with Major League Baseball. You could talk about whether Ohio State should’ve been in the College Football Playoff and whether Oklahoma’s making it over the Buckeyes was a referendum on their talent level. You could even punt on making a strong statement and tell viewers to wait for the combine later this month.

Smith … tried something different.

He said Haskins is “more of a runner than a thrower,” adding, “I could be wrong about that, but that’s what I find.”

Should ESPN fire Stephen A. Smith?

Wrong? This was, to use a Smith catchphrase, “stay off the weed”-level wrong. If you said that in an argument at a bar, the bartender would be legally obligated to stop serving you alcohol because there’s no way you’d be sober enough to safely get home based on that statement.

Haskins completed 70 percent of his passes for 4,831 yards and 50 touchdowns.

He ran for 108 yards on 79 carries.

Fred Flintstone did more running starting up his car than Haskins did on the football field.

Murray, meanwhile, averaged 7.2 yards per carry and ran for 1,001 yards at Oklahoma.

The clip proves that Smith either didn’t watch a single Ohio State game or wasn’t paying attention when he did:

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Ohio State podcasters “A Bunch of Nuts” stated the obvious in reply:

Michael David Smith of Pro Football Talk delivered a helmet-to-helmet slobber-knocker of a hit on Smith’s hot take:

The joke there is that Stephen A. said Henry would be a huge factor in a game between the Kansas City Chiefs and Los Angeles Chargers when Henry had been injured all season, something anyone who had done even the most minimal amount of preparation to appear on television would’ve been expected to know.

The implication, and one that increasingly seems backed by the evidence, is that Stephen A. Smith doesn’t watch the sports he’s paid to cover on national television for a national audience.

Of course Smith doubled down, citing Haskins’ “athleticism.”

And, like a blackjack player doubling down on 12 and getting dealt a king, Smith got busted out on his insane logic:

No cake is truly delicious without icing, so here’s the icing on that Twitter cake, courtesy of Smith:

We also shall see how much longer viewers pay attention to Smith’s uninformed hot takes.

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Boston born and raised, Fox has been writing about sports since 2011. He covered ESPN Friday Night Fights shows for The Boxing Tribune before shifting focus and launching Pace and Space, the home of "Smart NBA Talk for Smart NBA Fans", in 2015. He can often be found advocating for various NBA teams to pack up and move to his adopted hometown of Seattle.
Boston born and raised, Fox has been writing about sports since 2011. He covered ESPN Friday Night Fights shows for The Boxing Tribune before shifting focus and launching Pace and Space, the home of "Smart NBA Talk for Smart NBA Fans", in 2015. He can often be found advocating for various NBA teams to pack up and move to his adopted hometown of Seattle.
Birthplace
Boston, Massachusetts
Education
Bachelor of Science in Accounting from University of Nevada-Reno
Location
Seattle, Washington
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Sports




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