Commentary

Stories of Other Women Sexually Assaulted Massively Conflict With Ford's Account

Combined Shape

The big story Monday is going to be the official outing of Brett Kavanaugh’s accuser in The Washington Post. In a lengthy piece, Christine Blasey Ford, a 51-year-old research psychologist, says that she was sexually assaulted by Kavanaugh in “the early 1980s.”

“While his friend watched, she said, Kavanaugh pinned her to a bed on her back and groped her over her clothes, grinding his body against hers and clumsily attempting to pull off her one-piece bathing suit and the clothing she wore over it,” The Post’s story reads. “When she tried to scream, she said, he put his hand over her mouth.”

“I thought he might inadvertently kill me,” she told the paper. “He was trying to attack me and remove my clothing.”

Ford claims she was able to get away when “Kavanaugh’s friend and classmate at Georgetown Preparatory School, Mark Judge, jumped on top of them, sending all three tumbling. She said she ran from the room, briefly locked herself in a bathroom and then fled the house.”

This prompted predictable left-wing outrage on social media like this:

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However, one thing those on social media noticed were the details of the story — or rather, the fungibility of some of them.

For instance, take the fact that Ford doesn’t necessarily know the year of the alleged assault, much less the date. The story first places the assault “one summer in the early 1980s.” Later in the story, Ford says that “she believes it occurred in the summer of 1982, when she was 15, around the end of her sophomore year at the all-girls Holton-Arms School in Bethesda.”

There were also a therapist’s notes produced as evidence: “The notes say four boys were involved, a discrepancy Ford says was an error on the therapist’s part. Ford said there were four boys at the party but only two in the room.”

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Kavanaugh’s name also appears nowhere in the therapist’s notes, just that they were “from an elitist boys’ school” and were “highly respected and high-ranking members of society in Washington.”

All of this made Twitterers somewhat suspicious.

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At this early hour, it’s too early to pass judgment on anything. We can’t even confirm that these stories are real, given the fact that they were proffered over social media.

What we can unequivocally state is that the timing of this accusation is too convenient and the facts seem awfully vague. Not only is that suspicious because of the impact Ford says it’s had upon her life, it’s also suspicious because it makes an alibi completely impossible for Kavanaugh. If it could have happened during any summer in the early 1980s, how can Kavanaugh reasonably defend himself? Victims can forget details, but these are an awful lot of details to forget.

Again, the hour is early, but the details doth reek of something other than unalloyed truth.

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C. Douglas Golden is a writer who splits his time between the United States and Southeast Asia. Specializing in political commentary and world affairs, he's written for Conservative Tribune and The Western Journal for four years.
C. Douglas Golden is a writer who splits his time between the United States and Southeast Asia. Specializing in political commentary and world affairs, he's written for Conservative Tribune and The Western Journal for four years. Aside from politics, he enjoys spending time with his wife, literature (especially British comic novels and modern Japanese lit), indie rock, coffee, Formula One and football (of both American and world varieties).
Birthplace
Morristown, New Jersey
Education
Catholic University of America
Languages Spoken
English, Spanish
Topics of Expertise
American Politics, World Politics, Culture




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