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UK Police Seized Cache of 'Super Deadly' Weapons

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Gun grabbers in America often point to the United Kingdom as an example of a country that’s enacted “common sense” gun control, but a 2014 tweet from a Metropolitan Police Service division reveals the futility and ridiculousness of such measures.

Despite the country’s strict laws on firearms, violent crime still occurs in the U.K. — so much so that the London murder rate surpassed New York City in the month of March.

Though a criminal may have a more difficult time getting a gun, those intent on committing violent acts still find a way with whatever they can use as a deadly weapon — especially knives and other bladed or blunt items.

This, of course, has prompted the police to crack down on other “weapons” with sweeps and seizures.

A 2014 tweet from the Harrow MPS about the results of one such weapons sweep left many Twitter users wondering if the tweet was from a parody account.

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Yes, those deadly weapons in the photo are a croquet mallet and a plastic toy gun, orange muzzle tip and all.

We’re sure the residents of the Harrow borough — and croquet balls everywhere — slept quite soundly that night almost four years ago.

The funniest part of the whole thing: The Harrow Borough Police actually retweeted this older post, lending even more credence to the notion that they have become a satirical parody of themselves.

Do you agree that gun control doesn't stop violent crime?

Twitchy noted that in light of the recent surge of violent crime in the U.K — in spite of strict gun control laws — this old tweet had been discovered and given new life on the internet.

The 2014 tweet isn’t an isolated incident. U.K. police accounts still boast about seized items they consider “dangerous weapons” that most Americans would view as mere kitchen utensils, such as a four-inch paring knife seized in January.

At least that common kitchen utensil is sharp and could be dangerous if misused — either blatantly or accidentally — so perhaps we’ll have to give them that.

But perhaps the most ludicrously dystopian example of what can and will happen once guns are banned was shared by the Regents Park Police in March when they proudly displayed the “weapons” they had taken off the streets of London.

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Yep, those dangerous weapons include screwdrivers, a pair of scissors, a file, needle-nosed pliers and wire cutters. In other words, the contents of an average tool box or kitchen drawer in America.

Of course, any of those items could be misused to cause harm to another individual. But that’s the point — even if guns are removed from the situation, evil people will still find a way to inflict violence on others using whatever means necessary — an indisputable fact that blows up the argument that gun control will make us all  safer.

And it’s all the more reason for law-abiding citizens to be armed … with guns.

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Ben Marquis is a writer who identifies as a constitutional conservative/libertarian. He has written about current events and politics for The Western Journal since 2014. His focus is on protecting the First and Second Amendments.
Ben Marquis has written on current events and politics for The Western Journal since 2014. He reads voraciously and writes about the news of the day from a conservative-libertarian perspective. He is an advocate for a more constitutional government and a staunch defender of the Second Amendment, which protects the rest of our natural rights. He lives in Little Rock, Arkansas, with the love of his life as well as four dogs and four cats.
Birthplace
Louisiana
Nationality
American
Education
The School of Life
Location
Little Rock, Arkansas
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Politics




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