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Vermont School First to Raise Momument to Black Lives Matter

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The dream of Martin Luther King Jr. was a country that looked past race and didn’t even see skin color. Now, it looks like the left has corrupted that vision and made everything about racial division and color.

A high school in Vermont is now promoting a group that is known to be militant and sometimes overtly racist: Black Lives Matter. Montpelier High School is boasting that they are the first school to raise the controversial BLM flag in a ceremony meant to highlight Black History Month.

“On Thursday, black students took turns raising the flag in a ceremony attended by students, staff and community members,” The Associated Press reported. “The student-led move in the Montpelier school that is less than 5 percent black has sparked some backlash.”

Students in the crowd watching the flag being raised held signs marked with the “black power” fist, a symbol famously used by the Black Panthers supremacist group.

It would be one thing if students wanted to celebrate the lives of great African-Americans in a way that promoted equality. The problem, however, is that the “Black Lives Matter” movement is itself extremely divisive… and has become known for its hatred directed at police officers in America.

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In 2016, a Black Lives Matter supporter named Micah Xavier Johnson murdered five police officers in Dallas, Texas after declaring that he wanted to kill white people.

More recently, a man in Florida screamed “Black Lives Matter!” during an assault against police officers and while making additional threats against law enforcement.

BLM has also violently stormed buildings, rioted and set fire to cars, and was even called “thieves in the night” by none other than the father of Michael Brown.

Such great role models!

Does a Black Lives Matter flag belong on a public school flag pole?

It’s worth remembering that “Black Lives Matter” is an actual organization with political goals and a race-based agenda — and it’s not actually about equality.

For example, a BLM chapter in Philadelphia recently declared that only black students were allowed to attend their meetings or become members. “White people” were not welcome.

“He (Martin Luther King Jr.) made that choice and we have made ours. White people can support us but they cannot attend our meetings,” the group declared. Emphasis added.

Yes, “Black Lives Matter” is now even spitting on the unifying legacy of King by being openly racist, but nobody on the left seems to see the problem.

How is it appropriate for a public school to raise the flag of a specific group that is at best divisive and at worst black supremacists?

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Imagine for one moment the backlash that would occur if a public school flew a flag with a pro-white slogan. It would be called out as inappropriate and divisive.

Or, for that matter, what do you think would happen if a public school raised a “BLUE Lives Matter” flag during a ceremony? The left would tear its hair out, but double standards clearly apply when a left-leaning organization is involved.

There is a major difference between celebrating black accomplishments while joining in unity toward a better future, and driving a wedge deeper between races by supporting a group like BLM. It seems the school in Vermont has chosen the wedge.

Please press “Share on Facebook” if you believe BLM has twisted the true meaning of equality!

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Benjamin Arie is an independent journalist and writer. He has personally covered everything ranging from local crime to the U.S. president as a reporter in Michigan before focusing on national politics. Ben frequently travels to Latin America and has spent years living in Mexico.




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