Lifestyle

Woman Releases Grave Warning After Pre-Workout Drink Leaves Husband in ER

Combined Shape

After a near-death experience tied to consuming a pre-workout drink, a Wisconsin couple is sharing their story to potentially save lives.

Kevin Carley, 42, and his wife, Daphne Buxman-Carley, live in Greenville, Wisconsin. They prioritize their health and fitness, regularly working out and eating nutritious food.

In March 2018, Kevin and Daphne went to the gym on a typical Saturday morning.

One minute, Kevin was running on a treadmill. The next thing he knew, he woke up two days later in a hospital bed.

About 15 minutes into his run, Kevin’s heart went into cardiac arrest. Doctors were at a loss as to why, especially after Kevin’s medical testing came back normal.

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Daphne recalled the questions doctors asked her regarding her husband’s health, whether he had seizures or medical issues.

“At this point, we were the healthiest we’ve ever been,” Daphne told Inside Edition.

The questions turned to Kevin’s diet — what, precisely, had he consumed on the morning of his cardiac arrest?

“I remembered he would sometimes take a pre-workout drink before the gym, but I had no idea what that would have to do with any of this,” Daphne told Love What Matters. “A lot of people take pre-workout shakes and drinks and are perfectly fine.”

After weighing the factors involved in Kevin’s case, Kevin’s team of doctors eventually arrived at the consensus that the pre-workout drink played a role in forcing Kevin’s heart into overdrive.

The drink was not the only factor — doctors said that Kevin had created the “perfect storm” for his heart to go into cardiac arrest.

“The consensus from the cardiologist(s) and the electrical physiologist who put in his AED, was that his heart was overworked and couldn’t handle the amount of excess caffeine and other stimulants that were in the pre-workout drink he took,” Daphne said.

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“He was dehydrated, had no electrolytes and no sodium in his body the day of his event. The pre-workout drink put his otherwise extremely healthy heart over the breaking point and into cardiac arrest.”

The couple still believes that fitness is important, but no longer use any sort of energy drink or energy supplement when they work out.

“As a father of two beautiful daughters and husband to an amazing wife, I am truly blessed to be here writing this and I want people to be aware of the dangers of these drinks,” Kevin told Love What Matters.

“Of course, it’s easy to think you are invincible until you clinically die and come back. All because of a drink!”

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Combined Shape
A graduate of Grand Canyon University, Kim Davis has been writing for The Western Journal since 2015, focusing on lifestyle stories.
Kim Davis began writing for The Western Journal in 2015. Her primary topics cover family, faith, and women. She has experience as a copy editor for the online publication Thoughtful Women. Kim worked as an arts administrator for The Phoenix Symphony, writing music education curriculum and leading community engagement programs throughout the region. She holds a degree in music education from Grand Canyon University with a minor in eating tacos.
Birthplace
Page, Arizona
Education
Bachelor of Science in Music Education
Location
Phoenix, Arizona
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Lifestyle & Human Interest




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