Sports

Buzzed: Swarm of bees forces delay to Giants-Reds game

Combined Shape

CINCINNATI (AP) — San Francisco Giants manager Bruce Bochy’s last game in Cincinnati created more buzz than anyone imagined.

A swarm of bees circled above the backstop screen shortly before the start of the Giants’ game against the Reds on Monday, prompting an 18-minute delay to the first pitch. The umpires and players moved away from the plate and watched the buzz from a safe distance.

The bees soon moved toward the upper deck — workers closed press box windows as they came that way — and the game went on without further incident.

Nothing new for the Giants. Not when they come to Cincinnati.

They also were involved in a bee delay here that got national attention on April 17, 1976. A swarm made its way into San Francisco’s dugout at Riverfront Stadium, forcing players to flee. The game was halted for 35 minutes, and the Reds pulled away to an 11-0 victory.

Trending:
CNN's Don Lemon Fails to Get Guest to Take 'Bait,' Instead Gets Contradicted on Slavery

Bochy now has been involved in two unusual events at Great American Ball Park. The Giants were in town when one of the home run smokestacks in the outfield caught fire on May 15, 2015, forcing fans to evacuate two sections of the outfield while firefighters extinguished it.

Bochy is retiring after the season. The Reds honored him on the field Monday, before the bees arrived.

The Reds were involved in another notable bee delay on May 11, 1987, at Riverfront Stadium. A swarm prompted a 17-minute delay, and Reds pitcher Ted Power was stung on the hand.

___

More AP MLB: https://apnews.com/MLB and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →






We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
,
The Associated Press is an independent, not-for-profit news cooperative headquartered in New York City. Their teams in over 100 countries tell the world’s stories, from breaking news to investigative reporting. They provide content and services to help engage audiences worldwide, working with companies of all types, from broadcasters to brands.
The Associated Press was the first private sector organization in the U.S. to operate on a national scale. Over the past 170 years, they have been first to inform the world of many of history's most important moments, from the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and the bombing of Pearl Harbor to the fall of the Shah of Iran and the death of Pope John Paul.

Today, they operate in 263 locations in more than 100 countries relaying breaking news, covering war and conflict and producing enterprise reports that tell the world's stories.
Location
New York City




Conversation