Papal aide restores Rome building's power to help homeless

Combined Shape

ROME (AP) — Pope Francis’ almsgiver has gone down a Rome manhole to restore electricity for hundreds of homeless people living in an unused state-owned building.

Polish Cardinal Konrad Krajewski told Italian news agency ANSA he went underground and flipped a power switch Saturday in a “desperate gesture” to help the building’s more than 400 occupants.

Italian Interior Minister Matteo Salvini, leader of the far right League party, said Sunday he hopes the papal aide will pay 300,000 euros ($325,000) in overdue electricity bills.

Sister Adriana Domenici, who works with the homeless, told Italian broadcaster RaiNews24 that after the building’s electricity was cut off May 6, she called Krajewski for help.

She said that when utility workers returned to disconnect power again, they found a note from Krajewski and left the electricity running.

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →






We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
The Associated Press is an independent, not-for-profit news cooperative headquartered in New York City. Their teams in over 100 countries tell the world’s stories, from breaking news to investigative reporting. They provide content and services to help engage audiences worldwide, working with companies of all types, from broadcasters to brands.
The Associated Press was the first private sector organization in the U.S. to operate on a national scale. Over the past 170 years, they have been first to inform the world of many of history's most important moments, from the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and the bombing of Pearl Harbor to the fall of the Shah of Iran and the death of Pope John Paul.

Today, they operate in 263 locations in more than 100 countries relaying breaking news, covering war and conflict and producing enterprise reports that tell the world's stories.
Location
New York City




Conversation