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China Unveils Deadly New Weapon: A 'Flying Grenade' Designed to Be Carried by Ground Troops

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A Chinese company unveiled what its chief designer described as a “flying grenade” at an airshow in the southern city of Zhuhai this week.

The CH-817 is a mini drone weighing just 28 ounces. It can be used for both reconnaissance and attack missions, according to the Global Times, which is published by the Chinese Communist Party.

“We can call it a flying grenade,” said Shi Wen, designer of the CH drone series.

The CH-817 can fly for up to 15 minutes and be carried by individual soldiers, according to The Washington Free Beacon.

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The Chinese manufacturer CH UAV also showed off its CH-6 drone, which has a much longer endurance of 20 hours. The stealth drone can reach a top speed of 435 miles per hour.

“The drone can also carry out anti-submarine missions, maritime patrols, early warning missions and close-range air support,” the Times reported.

John Venable, a national security expert with The Heritage Foundation, told The Western Journal that neither drone is as groundbreaking as China would like the rest of the world to believe.

Concerning the CH-817 attack drone, the former U.S. Air Force fighter pilot said that these “suicide drones” are “everywhere now, so it’s nothing new.

“It’s just going to change the way the battlefield is run from this point forward,” he said.

Regarding the CH-6, Venable noted that it does not have stealth capabilities and that “400 miles an hour is not really that fast.” It is comparable to the U.S. Reaper drone.

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Further, he pointed out that the advertised top speed cannot be sustained for long flights without running out of fuel.

Nevertheless, according to the Free Beacon, “Chinese drone buildup is an area of growing concern for defense planners, who say China could use a massive drone ‘swarm’ to take out U.S. or Taiwanese naval and air defenses.”

In fact, “war games conducted by American military strategists show allied forces losing the upper hand on China,” the Beacon reported.

The Chinese have been selling their drones the world over, including here in the U.S.

Axios reported in September that the Secret Service bought eight drones manufactured by China-based Da-Jiang Innovations on July 26, three days after the Defense Department released a statement saying DJI products “pose potential threats to national security.”

The FBI also purchased 19 DJI drones in July.

“Given everything we know about the Chinese Communist Party and its companies, there is absolutely no excuse for any government agency to use DJI drones, or any other drones manufactured in countries identified as national security threats,” GOP Sen. Marco Rubio told Axios.

Last week, Republican Rep. Jim Banks of Indiana, an Afghanistan War veteran, sent a letter to Attorney General Merrick Garland demanding answers for the purchases. He noted that DJI has been flagged by the U.S. intelligence community as a spy risk.

“As a Member of the House Armed Services Committee who has been briefed on the cyber security threat that these Chinese-made drones pose, I am very concerned that these drones will be used by malevolent actors within the Chinese Communist Party to spy on individuals the Secret Service is charged with protecting,” Banks wrote, according to the Free Beacon.

“These individuals include President Joe Biden and his immediate family, Vice President Kamala Harris and her immediate family, former presidents Donald Trump, Barrack Obama, George W. Bush, Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter and their spouses, and other visiting heads of foreign states.”

Venable agrees that the Chinese Communist Party will use the drones Chinese companies sell to the U.S. and other nations to gather intelligence.

“Every Chinese company works for the government — the CCP government — and it’s one of those things that you cannot avoid,” he said.

“Anybody who buys them is buying into a Chinese network that is looking to collect as much information, not just about what they’re looking at, but about what China wants to know about their countries.”

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Randy DeSoto has written more than 2,000 articles for The Western Journal since he joined the company in 2015. He is a graduate of West Point and Regent University School of Law. He is the author of the book "We Hold These Truths" and screenwriter of the political documentary "I Want Your Money."
Randy DeSoto is the senior staff writer for The Western Journal. He wrote and was the assistant producer of the documentary film "I Want Your Money" about the perils of Big Government, comparing the presidencies of Ronald Reagan and Barack Obama. Randy is the author of the book "We Hold These Truths," which addresses how leaders have appealed to beliefs found in the Declaration of Independence at defining moments in our nation's history. He has been published in several political sites and newspapers.

Randy graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point with a BS in political science and Regent University School of Law with a juris doctorate.
Birthplace
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
Nationality
American
Honors/Awards
Graduated dean's list from West Point
Education
United States Military Academy at West Point, Regent University School of Law
Books Written
We Hold These Truths
Professional Memberships
Virginia and Pennsylvania state bars
Location
Phoenix, Arizona
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Politics, Entertainment, Faith




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