Video Surfaces of Actress Snared in College Bribery Scandal Lecturing About 'Educational Inequality'

Long before she became infamous for her arrest as part of what prosecutors say was a scheme to make sure some of America’s richest kids entered some of America’s top colleges, actress Felicity Huffman was fighting educational equality.

A brief video emerged on Twitter showing Huffman, who starred in ABC’s “Desperate Housewives,” sporting a “Cool Mom” top posing with the number 10,400,650.

“The number represents just one of the 130 million girls who don’t have access to an education. If these girls were a country, they would be the tenth largest in the world, approximately the size of the U.K. and France combined,” she said.

“No girl should be denied the opportunity to learn and it’s on us to make the change,” she said. “Let’s get that number down to zero.”

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Huffman and former “Full House” star Lori Loughlin were charged along with at least 40 other people Tuesday in a scheme in which parents bribed coaches and testing center staff to get their children into elite colleges, prosecutors said.

Huffman is accused of paying $15,000 to get her daughter into college, an amount that recalls an episode of “Desperate Housewives,” as noted by USA Today.

Huffman’s Twitter video remained, but the actress wiped her Instagram account of a Saturday message she had posted to mothers, Us magazine reported.

“To all the moms out there, you’re all superheroes and you’re all good enough,” she captioned the photo, adding, “Don’t let anyone tell you differently. Treat yourself today …”

Several of the colleges involved in the scam were sued Wednesday in a class-action suit filed by Erica Olson and Kalea Woods, two Stanford students, according to Fox News.

The lawsuit seeks $5,000,001 in damages. The suit targeted Yale, the University of Southern California, the University of San Diego, the University of Texas at Austin, Wake Forest, Georgetown, and Stanford. William Singer, identified by prosecutors as the lead figure in the scheme, was also named.

“Each of the universities were negligent in failing to maintain adequate protocols and security measures in place to guarantee the sanctity of the college admissions process, and to ensure that their own employees were not engaged in these type of bribery schemes,” the complaint stated.

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“Unqualified students found their way into the admissions rolls of highly selective universities, while those students who played by the rules and did not have college-bribing parents were denied admission.”

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Olsen said she would not have applied to Yale if she knew its admission system was “warped and rigged by fraud.”

“She was never informed that the process of admission was an unfair, rigged process, in which rich parents could buy their way into the university through bribery,” the suit stated.

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Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack can be reached at jackwritings1@gmail.com.
Location
New York City
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English
Topics of Expertise
Politics, Foreign Policy, Military & Defense Issues




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