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If You Want a Retired Military Working Dog, Now's the Time To Apply

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There’s no time like the present if you and your family are interested in adopting a retired military working dog.

Joint Base San Antonio announced that retired military working dogs are “looking for family, homes, couches” in a July post.

The dogs that are being adopted out are not just retired MWDs, either.

Some of the canines up for adoption include puppies from the MWD foster program, breeding and training program eliminations, and even some of the medically discharged dogs.

While puppies are what most people are interested in, older MWDs that have been through training offer top-of-the-line obedience and skills.

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To avoid abuse and exploitation, the adoption program does come with a few stipulations.

“To be approved for a MWD adoption, applicants must have a six-foot fence, no children under the age of five and no more than three dogs already in the home,” the post reads.

“They must also have a veterinarian listed on the application and two references.”

Prospective owners must also register the ID chip of any MWD they adopt, as well as bring an approved crate when bringing their new family member home.

Would you adopt a retired military working dog?

According to the 341st Training Squadron, which is responsible for training some of the dogs that end up working for the Department of Defense and other agencies, civilians are considered for adoptions, but other groups take precedence.

“Title 10 US Code 2583 gives priority first to civilian law enforcement agencies, then to prior handlers, and finally to the general public,” a post from the squadron reads.

The approval and adoption process can take up to two years to complete, or happen “almost immediately”

Once in their new home, these fiercely loyal dogs are guaranteed to be a life-changer.

If there’s anything these selfless animals deserve after a tough career, it’s the chance to relax in a civilian home and enjoy all the treats, playtime and love their new family can offer.

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Adopting one of these dogs virtually guarantees a companion and friend for as long as it lives. And if you’re lucky enough to secure an already trained canine, there won’t be a single teenager ready to take a chance hiding pot in the home.

For more information about the MWD adoption program or to inquire about adopting a dog of your own, email mwd.adoptions@us.af.mil to learn more.

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Jared has written more than 200 articles and assigned hundreds more since he joined The Western Journal in February 2017. He was an infantryman in the Arkansas and Georgia National Guard and is a husband, dad and aspiring farmer.
Jared has written more than 200 articles and assigned hundreds more since he joined The Western Journal in February 2017. He is a husband, dad, and aspiring farmer. He was an infantryman in the Arkansas and Georgia National Guard. If he's not with his wife and son, then he's either shooting guns or working on his motorcycle.
Location
Arkansas
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Military, firearms, history




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