DNA testing helps police confirm Bundy killed missing teen

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SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Authorities say DNA testing helped them confirm notorious serial killer Ted Bundy also murdered a northern Utah teen.

KSL-TV reports Bountiful Police Sgt. Shane Alexander announced Monday that investigators retrieved a human patella bone, or kneecap, three and a half years ago that authorities had given to the family of Debra Kent.

Alexander says DNA testing on the bone confirmed it belonged to Kent.

Alexander says the 17-year-old Kent was with her parents at a Viewmont High School play in November 1974, when she left during intermission to pick up her brother at an ice skating rink.

Alexander says she left and never returned.

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Alexander says Bundy, 36 hours before his 1989 execution, confessed to killing Kent and other young women and told police where he left Kent’s body.

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Information from: KSL-TV, http://www.ksl.com/

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