Share

Fan struck in head by batted ball at Dodger game dies

Share

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A woman died as a result of being struck in the head by a foul ball at Dodger Stadium last August, according to a coroner’s report obtained by ESPN .

Linda Goldbloom was celebrating her 79th birthday and 59th wedding anniversary at a game Aug. 25 when a ball hit by a San Diego Padres player traveled over an area protected by netting and struck Goldbloom in the head. She died four days later at L.A. County-USC Medical Center.

The Los Angeles County coroner’s report said trauma from the batted ball was the cause of death.

The Dodgers said in a statement they were “deeply saddened” by Goldbloom’s death and the “matter has been resolved between the Dodgers and the Goldbloom family.”

For the first time last season, all 30 major league ballparks had expanded protective netting that reached to at least the far ends of each dugout. The push for expansion increased in 2017 after a series of spectator injuries.

Trending:
Trump Handed a Massive Win Right After Assassination Attempt as Classified Docs Case Gets Hit Hard

___

In a previous version of this story, a reference to Franmil Reyes was removed from the second paragraph.

___

More AP MLB: https://apnews.com/MLB and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →



We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
Share
The Associated Press is an independent, not-for-profit news cooperative headquartered in New York City. Their teams in over 100 countries tell the world’s stories, from breaking news to investigative reporting. They provide content and services to help engage audiences worldwide, working with companies of all types, from broadcasters to brands. Photo credit: @AP on Twitter
The Associated Press was the first private sector organization in the U.S. to operate on a national scale. Over the past 170 years, they have been first to inform the world of many of history's most important moments, from the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and the bombing of Pearl Harbor to the fall of the Shah of Iran and the death of Pope John Paul.

Today, they operate in 263 locations in more than 100 countries relaying breaking news, covering war and conflict and producing enterprise reports that tell the world's stories.
Location
New York City




Conversation