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Jones can fight at UFC 235 despite new drug test woes

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Light heavyweight champion Jon Jones will be allowed to fight at UFC 235 on Saturday despite two recent drug tests showing traces of a steroid metabolite.

The Nevada State Athletic Commission announced the findings Thursday and affirmed its belief that the tests do not reflect new drug use by the UFC star.

The commission believes the two positive tests conducted Feb. 14 and 15 uncovered residual results from the drug intake that resulted in a 15-month suspension for Jones in 2017. Tiny amounts of the same metabolite have periodically appeared in several tests taken by Jones since then.

Jones has denied ever knowingly taking performance-enhancing drugs.

Jones received a one-fight license from the commission last month to face Anthony Smith this weekend.

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