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Lindsey Graham Gets Bad News from SCOTUS - Will Have to Testify Before Special Grand Jury

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The Supreme Court on Tuesday lifted a temporary hold on Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham’s testimony in a Georgia investigation of possible illegal interference in the 2020 election by then-President Donald Trump and his allies in the state.

The court left no legal impediments in the way of Graham’s appearance before a special grand jury, now scheduled for Nov. 17.

But in an unsigned order, the justices noted that Graham still could raise objections to some questions.

The South Carolina senator, a top Trump ally, had argued that a provision of the Constitution — the speech and debate clause — shielded him from being forced to testify.

Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis had told the justices that “the delay resulting from a stay would be unavoidably harmful” to the grand jury investigation.

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Lower courts had rebuffed Graham’s plea for a pause while the legal case plays out.

Tuesday’s order dissolved a temporary hold that Justice Clarence Thomas had placed on the testimony while he and his colleagues weighed the arguments.

The Western Journal has reviewed this Associated Press story and may have altered it prior to publication to ensure that it meets our editorial standards.

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