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Metta World Peace opens up on eve of NBA Finals

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Metta World Peace is happy, something he wasn’t during most of his time in the NBA. He’s also at peace with himself, he tells PodcastOne Sports Now , after rescuing both his career and his life with therapy that helped him overcome the stigma of the 2004 brawl in Detroit that became known as “Malice at the Palace.”

The former Ron Artest joins co-hosts Tim Dahlberg and Jim Litke to talk about his career and his life after, and whether the 2010 Lakers he played on could have beaten the current Golden State Warriors.

World Peace credits intense therapy with helping him shed his anger and become not only a better person but a much better teammate. And he looks at the championship he won in Los Angeles at the defining moment of his career, not the brawl in Detroit that cost him $5 million, a one-year suspension and the scorn of fans everywhere.

The hosts also preview the NBA playoffs with Tim Reynolds, NBA writer for The Associated Press. And they talk soft food and why scrambled eggs might be the perfect food.

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

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The Associated Press is an independent, not-for-profit news cooperative headquartered in New York City. Their teams in over 100 countries tell the world’s stories, from breaking news to investigative reporting. They provide content and services to help engage audiences worldwide, working with companies of all types, from broadcasters to brands.
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Today, they operate in 263 locations in more than 100 countries relaying breaking news, covering war and conflict and producing enterprise reports that tell the world's stories.
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