Share

Michael Kors throws a '70s bash with Barry Manilow on stage

Share

NEW YORK (AP) — Michael Kors threw a fashion show worthy of Studio 54 with Barry Manilow belting “Copacabana” on a glittery stage and rock muse Patti Hansen walking the runway Wednesday.

His crowd, seated inside a Wall Street ballroom, went wild for both on the closing day of New York Fashion Week as he rolled out shaggy coats and feather boas, sparkly gowns in neon purple and electric blue, and flirty ruffles on dresses and skirts, all worthy of the heady ’70s.

Sisters Bella and Gigi Hadid took to the catwalk to help move the bash along, but the surprise of Manilow’s performance had the crowd on its feet. The 75-year-old legend is still going strong, proudly showing off his orange bedazzled “Copa” jacket backstage after the upbeat show.

It’s just what the fashion crowd needed on the eighth day of racing from show to show during fashion week, and the day after an icy snowstorm made that even more challenging.

Kors fall collection celebrated the city’s melting pot of style and the kings and queens of the era: Bette, Bianca and Baryshnikov among them. The designer’s impeccable tailoring and eye for details were plentiful in the clothes, from his delicate slip dresses to a killer patchwork leather jacket with black shearling sleeves.

Trending:
Here Are the Justices Who Handed Biden a Win for His Vaccine Mandate for Health Care Workers

Hansen, a ’70s superstar model, is married to Keith Richards and took her turn on the catwalk with a smile on her face, dressed in an iridescent trouser suit of black and gold.

There was star power on Kors’ front row as well: Kerry Washington, Catherine Zeta-Jones and her husband, Michael Douglas, along with “If Beale Street Could Talk” Oscar nominee Regina King.

After the show, Kors called Manilow’s appearance the cherry on the cake.

“We met him exactly a year ago. It’s very bizarre, backstage at a concert. I like everyone else am a huge fan,” Kors told The Associated Press. “I said to him, ‘Have you ever gone to a fashion show?’ And he said no. I said ‘Watch a few of our shows on YouTube, maybe we can do something in the future.'”

The theme didn’t come together until Kors found himself perusing his old yearbook and got to thinking about his start in New York in the late-70s, and “just this whole convergence of glamour.”

At the time, the city was “pretty gritty and pretty dangerous,” he recalled, “and music was a huge part of it, and dance. And Patti Hansen was all over my walls. I think the last fashion show she was in was in 1994.”

Ultimately, Kors said, he wanted to put together an optimistic collection. Perhaps his crushed satin charmeuse blouse in cocoa would boost your mood and not bust your budget.

There were banker looks as well, in cropped plaid trousers and belted jackets. And, always, Kors showed a few great bags, for the shoulder and for a quick trip out of town.

“I wanted joy,” Kors explained. “I think maybe I’m a Pollyanna but you know I think that the right clothes and the right attitude can just lift your spirits.”

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →



We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
Share
The Associated Press is an independent, not-for-profit news cooperative headquartered in New York City. Their teams in over 100 countries tell the world’s stories, from breaking news to investigative reporting. They provide content and services to help engage audiences worldwide, working with companies of all types, from broadcasters to brands.
The Associated Press was the first private sector organization in the U.S. to operate on a national scale. Over the past 170 years, they have been first to inform the world of many of history's most important moments, from the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and the bombing of Pearl Harbor to the fall of the Shah of Iran and the death of Pope John Paul.

Today, they operate in 263 locations in more than 100 countries relaying breaking news, covering war and conflict and producing enterprise reports that tell the world's stories.
Location
New York City




Conversation

The Western Journal is pleased to bring back comments to our articles! Due to threatened de-monetization by Big Tech, we had temporarily removed comments, but we have now implemented a solution to bring back the conversation that Big Tech doesn't want you to have. If you have any problems using the new commenting platform, please contact customer support at commenting-help@insticator.com. Welcome back!