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Sports

The Latest: Ex-Stanford coach avoids prison in bribery case

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BOSTON (AP) — The Latest on the former Stanford sailing coach’s sentencing for his role in the college admissions bribery scheme (all times local):

5:10 p.m.

A former Stanford sailing coach who avoided prison time for his role in a college admissions scam says he is “ashamed” for bringing a “cloud” over the university.

John Vandemoer addressed reporters Wednesday after a federal judge in Boston sentenced him to one day in prison, which he was deemed to have served. He will serve two years of supervised release, including six months of home confinement.

Vandemoer said he believed he was helping the team but now sees that his actions were wrong. He pleaded guilty in March to agreeing to help students get into the school in exchange for payments to the sailing program.

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Vandemoer said he is sorry for letting down his athletes, family and friends.

He is the first person to be sentenced in the sweeping case, which has also ensnared Hollywood celebrities and business executives.

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3:30 p.m.

A former head sailing coach at Stanford will avoid prison after he admitted to accepting bribes in the college admissions cheating scheme.

John Vandemoer apologized to his friends, family, the sailing team and Stanford during the sentencing hearing Wednesday in Boston federal court.

U.S. District Court Judge Rya Zobel sentenced him to one day in prison, which he was deemed to have served. He will pay a $10,000 fine and serve two years of supervised release, including six months of home confinement with electronic monitoring.

Vandemoer is the first person to be sentenced in the case that exposed the lengths that some wealthy parents will go to get their children into the nation’s top schools.

His lawyers had sought probation, noting he didn’t pocket any of the money for himself and put it all towards the sailing program.

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5:40 a.m.

Prosecutors are seeking more than a year in prison for a former Stanford sailing coach who admitted to participating in the college admissions bribery scheme.

John Vandemoer is scheduled to be sentenced Wednesday in Boston federal court. He’s the first defendant to be sentenced in the case that has ensnared prominent parents and coaches at elite universities across the country.

Vandemoer pleaded guilty in March to taking money for the school’s sailing program in exchange for labeling prospective students as team recruits.

Vandemoer’s lawyers are seeking probation. They note that he accepted responsibility for his actions and didn’t pocket any of the money for himself.

Prosecutors say a “meaningful” prison sentence is “the only way to begin restoring confidence in a college admissions system that most people agree is needlessly unfair.”

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

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